Homework club in Greenstead to be axed

First published in News

A HOMEWORK centre which helps dozens of childen is being axed.

The centre at Greenstead Library in Colchester provides support for 65 students, mostly from Colchester Academy, but funding is being withdrawn.

A furious Julie Young, county councillor for the area, said it is the latest example of young people being let down.

And Colchester Academy headteacher Barry Hersom described the decision as a big disappointment.

Jeremy Lucas, councillor responsible for libraries at County Hall, told fellow councillors via letter.

He stated: “Originally homework centres in libraries were set up with time-limited funding from the National Lottery.

“When this funding ended, the majority of such arrangements across the county had to be discontinued.

“We were able to avoid this in Harlow and in Greenstead by means of a one year grant from the Essex County Council study support budget.

"Unfortunately, this too will no longer be available after March."

Mr Lucas claims the centres cost too much with the one at Greenstead costing almost £4,300 a year.

He said: “While these two areas are ones in which deprivation and social problems can be high, they are far from being the only ones in Essex and in the current financial climate we do have a responsibility to provide an equitable and widely accessible service.”

However, Mrs Young believes the way to provide an equal service is not to bring good schemes down but to widen them to help other deprived areas also.

She said: “This is yet another attack on the life chances of young people from our most deprived communities.”

She claims this, on top of the loss of Connexions, cuts to the education maintenance allowance and school funding, means children are being let down.

She added: “Youth unemployment has rocketing and we all know the importance of education in getting work.

“At both centres healthy numbers of young people are using this service. I am disgusted and will do what I can to save it.”

Mr Hersom added: “It is obviously disappointing to find out a valuable resource is no longer available but we do understand there are funding pressures.”

Those using the service will be able to continue using it until the end of the financial year.

Mr Lucas concluded: “I do recognise that the homework centres in Harlow and Greenstead libraries contribute towards the educational achievement of the students who use them and we would be willing to maintain the provision in those libraries if funding could be found.

“I am sorry about this but we are all aware that savings have to be made and we are trying to do this in ways which have the least negative impact.”

Comments (12)

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8:38pm Mon 27 Feb 12

wellnow says...

a homework club sounds more like a crib club to me never heard such nonsense.like they should pay more attention in class,then read up the subject.their homework would give the teacher a more useful appraisal of their understanding of the subject.
a homework club sounds more like a crib club to me never heard such nonsense.like they should pay more attention in class,then read up the subject.their homework would give the teacher a more useful appraisal of their understanding of the subject. wellnow
  • Score: 0

9:00pm Mon 27 Feb 12

ShallowRemarks says...

A homework club is a good thing as it gives children a chance to do their homework in a peaceful environment they may not get at home because of distractions such as TV etc,... It looks like you could have done with more homework on your written English wellnow.
A homework club is a good thing as it gives children a chance to do their homework in a peaceful environment they may not get at home because of distractions such as TV etc,... It looks like you could have done with more homework on your written English wellnow. ShallowRemarks
  • Score: 0

10:24pm Mon 27 Feb 12

Boris says...

Why doesn't Mr Hersom provide this homework club within his school? Or, since his school is an Academy with its own funding, why doesn't he fund the homework club at the library from his own budget?
Academies chose to cut loose from county council controls, so Mr. Hersom's school is no longer ECC's responsibility.
Why doesn't Mr Hersom provide this homework club within his school? Or, since his school is an Academy with its own funding, why doesn't he fund the homework club at the library from his own budget? Academies chose to cut loose from county council controls, so Mr. Hersom's school is no longer ECC's responsibility. Boris
  • Score: 0

11:35pm Mon 27 Feb 12

newtactic says...

This is yet another example of the young being deprived of their out of school activities through Government cuts. it is so unfair. So many families need these organised activities for children to fill the gap between school and parents returning from work. It really does seem to be a relatively small amount of money required to maintain such a useful service. And, as far as some remark about the Academy funding it, this Government has left school governors little choice, but to become academies, if they wish to get the most generous grants.
This is yet another example of the young being deprived of their out of school activities through Government cuts. it is so unfair. So many families need these organised activities for children to fill the gap between school and parents returning from work. It really does seem to be a relatively small amount of money required to maintain such a useful service. And, as far as some remark about the Academy funding it, this Government has left school governors little choice, but to become academies, if they wish to get the most generous grants. newtactic
  • Score: 0

6:54am Tue 28 Feb 12

Say It As It Is OK? says...

If there are 'dozens' of children using this homework club and it costs £4,300 a year to run then why don't the parents pay for it if they are not able to provide a 'home' environment for their children to do their homework?

Three dozen children using the club would cost around £2.50 a week per child (50p a day)

Or put it another way the cost of about 8 cigarettes a week!
If there are 'dozens' of children using this homework club and it costs £4,300 a year to run then why don't the parents pay for it if they are not able to provide a 'home' environment for their children to do their homework? Three dozen children using the club would cost around £2.50 a week per child (50p a day) Or put it another way the cost of about 8 cigarettes a week! Say It As It Is OK?
  • Score: 0

8:36am Tue 28 Feb 12

ShallowRemarks says...

Say It As It Is OK? wrote:
If there are 'dozens' of children using this homework club and it costs £4,300 a year to run then why don't the parents pay for it if they are not able to provide a 'home' environment for their children to do their homework?

Three dozen children using the club would cost around £2.50 a week per child (50p a day)

Or put it another way the cost of about 8 cigarettes a week!
Well said.
[quote][p][bold]Say It As It Is OK?[/bold] wrote: If there are 'dozens' of children using this homework club and it costs £4,300 a year to run then why don't the parents pay for it if they are not able to provide a 'home' environment for their children to do their homework? Three dozen children using the club would cost around £2.50 a week per child (50p a day) Or put it another way the cost of about 8 cigarettes a week![/p][/quote]Well said. ShallowRemarks
  • Score: 0

8:47am Tue 28 Feb 12

TheCaptain says...

Agree that this should be organised within the school property.
Agree that this should be organised within the school property. TheCaptain
  • Score: 0

10:02am Tue 28 Feb 12

Say It As It Is OK? says...

Just to add to my earlier comments......

Isn't homework more about parental interaction with their children, not so they can do the work for them but to encourage and motivate their children in self discipline. This will help them learn how to be 'self motivated' as they grow up. Probably something that is not learnt at any homework club.
Just to add to my earlier comments...... Isn't homework more about parental interaction with their children, not so they can do the work for them but to encourage and motivate their children in self discipline. This will help them learn how to be 'self motivated' as they grow up. Probably something that is not learnt at any homework club. Say It As It Is OK?
  • Score: 0

12:13pm Tue 28 Feb 12

newtactic says...

For some children the best chance they get is outside the home with activities such as homework clubs and other organised groups. This type of activity is a valuable way of training the young to use local facilities to their advantage. Anything which encourages children to work and learn outside the home and the school helps them towards a better future. When there are problems in the home or there is a long gap between working parents getting home, any useful activity in a local institution, such as a library, is a positive boon. Let's hope some of the parents are able to get together to replace the facility.
For some children the best chance they get is outside the home with activities such as homework clubs and other organised groups. This type of activity is a valuable way of training the young to use local facilities to their advantage. Anything which encourages children to work and learn outside the home and the school helps them towards a better future. When there are problems in the home or there is a long gap between working parents getting home, any useful activity in a local institution, such as a library, is a positive boon. Let's hope some of the parents are able to get together to replace the facility. newtactic
  • Score: 0

12:34pm Tue 28 Feb 12

Boris says...

newtactic wrote:
This is yet another example of the young being deprived of their out of school activities through Government cuts. it is so unfair. So many families need these organised activities for children to fill the gap between school and parents returning from work. It really does seem to be a relatively small amount of money required to maintain such a useful service. And, as far as some remark about the Academy funding it, this Government has left school governors little choice, but to become academies, if they wish to get the most generous grants.
This particular school chose to become an academy under the Labour government, and other local schools were made to suffer to allow it to happen.
Anyway, as you say, as academies these schools receive the most generous grants, so this one should be able to afford £4300 per year to cover the costs of running the homework club.
[quote][p][bold]newtactic[/bold] wrote: This is yet another example of the young being deprived of their out of school activities through Government cuts. it is so unfair. So many families need these organised activities for children to fill the gap between school and parents returning from work. It really does seem to be a relatively small amount of money required to maintain such a useful service. And, as far as some remark about the Academy funding it, this Government has left school governors little choice, but to become academies, if they wish to get the most generous grants.[/p][/quote]This particular school chose to become an academy under the Labour government, and other local schools were made to suffer to allow it to happen. Anyway, as you say, as academies these schools receive the most generous grants, so this one should be able to afford £4300 per year to cover the costs of running the homework club. Boris
  • Score: 0

3:59pm Tue 28 Feb 12

newtactic says...

As you so rightly point out Boris, this particular academy became one under the previous Government, which sought to address an achievement problem in schools by re-branding them academies, leaving the schools little choice in the matter by offering them more generous grants. But I still think it is important to get the children out of school for various clubs and activities and get them into the habit of finding useful things to do with their time outside home and school. I just hope the library branch in the area does not cut its opening hours.
As you so rightly point out Boris, this particular academy became one under the previous Government, which sought to address an achievement problem in schools by re-branding them academies, leaving the schools little choice in the matter by offering them more generous grants. But I still think it is important to get the children out of school for various clubs and activities and get them into the habit of finding useful things to do with their time outside home and school. I just hope the library branch in the area does not cut its opening hours. newtactic
  • Score: 0

4:31pm Wed 29 Feb 12

jut1972 says...

Mr Lucas claims the centres cost too much with the one at Greenstead costing almost £4,300 a year.

4,300 / 65 kids = £66 per kid per year, or £1.27 a week per child.

These will be the kids who are motivated to better themselves and are being slapped back down for £1.27 a week.

You said it yourself Mr Lucas, a "widely accessible service". You are providing that for 1.27, its probably the best money the council has spent all year and you want to close it?

GRADE A IDIOT.
Mr Lucas claims the centres cost too much with the one at Greenstead costing almost £4,300 a year. 4,300 / 65 kids = £66 per kid per year, or £1.27 a week per child. These will be the kids who are motivated to better themselves and are being slapped back down for £1.27 a week. You said it yourself Mr Lucas, a "widely accessible service". You are providing that for 1.27, its probably the best money the council has spent all year and you want to close it? GRADE A IDIOT. jut1972
  • Score: 0

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