Bridge linking Rowhedge and Wivenhoe plans

Essex County Standard: A Gazette artist's impression of how the bridge could look - not actual plans. A Gazette artist's impression of how the bridge could look - not actual plans.

A BRIDGE linking Rowhedge and Wivenhoe would benefit commuters, businesses and visitors, it is claimed.

But the crossing could cost up to £750,000.

John Niland, who lives in Rowhedge, wants his village connected with Wivenhoe across the River Colne.

  • Read the full story in today's Gazette

Comments (59)

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10:16am Wed 19 Feb 14

greenbroker says...

If they're moaning about the new bridge in the Castle Park, then this should finish them off.
If they're moaning about the new bridge in the Castle Park, then this should finish them off. greenbroker
  • Score: 17

10:49am Wed 19 Feb 14

Ritchie_Hicks says...

There is already a foot ferry.

This bridge will never happen.
There is already a foot ferry. This bridge will never happen. Ritchie_Hicks
  • Score: 1

11:42am Wed 19 Feb 14

Wicky1 says...

It would certainly benefit South of Colchester if there was a bridge across the Colne. Wouldn't go necessarily for a road bridge but a foot bridge doubling for cycles would allow access for folk to use Wivenhoe's train station, shops and facilities - plus it would help increase the genetic pool….
It would certainly benefit South of Colchester if there was a bridge across the Colne. Wouldn't go necessarily for a road bridge but a foot bridge doubling for cycles would allow access for folk to use Wivenhoe's train station, shops and facilities - plus it would help increase the genetic pool…. Wicky1
  • Score: 10

11:45am Wed 19 Feb 14

Ritchie_Hicks says...

Wicky1 wrote:
It would certainly benefit South of Colchester if there was a bridge across the Colne. Wouldn't go necessarily for a road bridge but a foot bridge doubling for cycles would allow access for folk to use Wivenhoe's train station, shops and facilities - plus it would help increase the genetic pool….
It would certainly benefit Rowhedge. But where £1million is going to come from, who knows...............
[quote][p][bold]Wicky1[/bold] wrote: It would certainly benefit South of Colchester if there was a bridge across the Colne. Wouldn't go necessarily for a road bridge but a foot bridge doubling for cycles would allow access for folk to use Wivenhoe's train station, shops and facilities - plus it would help increase the genetic pool….[/p][/quote]It would certainly benefit Rowhedge. But where £1million is going to come from, who knows............... Ritchie_Hicks
  • Score: 4

12:15pm Wed 19 Feb 14

wormshero says...

Ah, this would be lovely for walks/runs. My understanding of the foot ferry is that it only runs a few days a week, not throughout the entire week and only for an hour each side of high tide, which doesn't exactly make it practical, especially not as a way of commuting. Plus it'd work out £5.50 a day for a bike commuter, even if time wise it did make it practical to travel to catch the train. Have always felt a foot/bike bridge was needed since moving to the area; I like the idea that I'd be able to run to Wivenhoe, across the bridge into Rowhedge and then head back up diagonally towards Lexden during the summer evenings in one nice loop.
Ah, this would be lovely for walks/runs. My understanding of the foot ferry is that it only runs a few days a week, not throughout the entire week and only for an hour each side of high tide, which doesn't exactly make it practical, especially not as a way of commuting. Plus it'd work out £5.50 a day for a bike commuter, even if time wise it did make it practical to travel to catch the train. Have always felt a foot/bike bridge was needed since moving to the area; I like the idea that I'd be able to run to Wivenhoe, across the bridge into Rowhedge and then head back up diagonally towards Lexden during the summer evenings in one nice loop. wormshero
  • Score: 2

12:17pm Wed 19 Feb 14

Andyxyzzy says...

Thank heavens the Gazette artist doesn't do bridge designs.
Thank heavens the Gazette artist doesn't do bridge designs. Andyxyzzy
  • Score: 12

12:34pm Wed 19 Feb 14

pinkteapot says...

When you say "plans" in your headline, do you mean "requested by one resident of Rowhedge"?
When you say "plans" in your headline, do you mean "requested by one resident of Rowhedge"? pinkteapot
  • Score: 10

12:40pm Wed 19 Feb 14

Ritchie_Hicks says...

We could instroduce a fine of £1000 for every idiot who gets stuck on the Stood at Mersea and has to be rescued at high tide. By my calculations £100,000 would be raised to help fund this scheme in a matter of months ;)
We could instroduce a fine of £1000 for every idiot who gets stuck on the Stood at Mersea and has to be rescued at high tide. By my calculations £100,000 would be raised to help fund this scheme in a matter of months ;) Ritchie_Hicks
  • Score: 10

12:43pm Wed 19 Feb 14

hughie-s says...

CTruk are moving boat building from Brightlingsea to the Hythe so any bridge would need to have sufficient clearance to allow access or be opening, Hopefully with regular movements up river it will be dredged which if it included the turning area would allow barge trips, if Maldon can do it why not Colchester?
CTruk are moving boat building from Brightlingsea to the Hythe so any bridge would need to have sufficient clearance to allow access or be opening, Hopefully with regular movements up river it will be dredged which if it included the turning area would allow barge trips, if Maldon can do it why not Colchester? hughie-s
  • Score: 4

12:45pm Wed 19 Feb 14

Wicky1 says...

http://www.wivenhoef
orum.co.uk/discussio
n/3605/wivenhoe-town
-council-meeting-feb
ruary-17th-2014
http://www.wivenhoef orum.co.uk/discussio n/3605/wivenhoe-town -council-meeting-feb ruary-17th-2014 Wicky1
  • Score: -4

1:20pm Wed 19 Feb 14

romantic says...

Interesting idea. Would probably have a big effect on Rowhedge, as it would become far easier to commute from there to London. Whether that's a good or bad thing, I don't know. Could end up with commuters wanting to park in Rowhedge and then walk across, which could become an issue. According to the doc posted by wicky1, it would be an opening bridge, which in itself would potentially be an attraction. I reckon it's worth looking at.
Interesting idea. Would probably have a big effect on Rowhedge, as it would become far easier to commute from there to London. Whether that's a good or bad thing, I don't know. Could end up with commuters wanting to park in Rowhedge and then walk across, which could become an issue. According to the doc posted by wicky1, it would be an opening bridge, which in itself would potentially be an attraction. I reckon it's worth looking at. romantic
  • Score: 0

1:56pm Wed 19 Feb 14

Wicky1 says...

There was a bridge between Ruffedge & Wivenhoe in the early 20th century.

http://www.movablebr
idges.org.uk/BridgeP
age.asp?BridgeNumber
=1062

It was situated in front of the Albion pub, down river from the ferry hard. It was used by troops at Cherry tree camp Blackheath on the Mersea Road, for quick access to the railway at Wivenhoe. Built for the first world war. The centre section worked on a cantilever system to allow barge traffic through to the Hythe.

http://3.bp.blogspot
.com/-wGKbv-1c0hw/Up
XPAcZJ8KI/AAAAAAAAAm
E/Cl8vunNJ0_E/s1600/
PICT0051-001.JPG
There was a bridge between Ruffedge & Wivenhoe in the early 20th century. http://www.movablebr idges.org.uk/BridgeP age.asp?BridgeNumber =1062 It was situated in front of the Albion pub, down river from the ferry hard. It was used by troops at Cherry tree camp Blackheath on the Mersea Road, for quick access to the railway at Wivenhoe. Built for the first world war. The centre section worked on a cantilever system to allow barge traffic through to the Hythe. http://3.bp.blogspot .com/-wGKbv-1c0hw/Up XPAcZJ8KI/AAAAAAAAAm E/Cl8vunNJ0_E/s1600/ PICT0051-001.JPG Wicky1
  • Score: 0

2:01pm Wed 19 Feb 14

Say It As It Is OK? says...

Pie in the sky......For a start £750,000 is a joke!
There were moves to put a footbridge across the A12 a few years ago, which came to nothing, but the main stumbling block was cost and broad estimates were £4.0 million then.
Pie in the sky......For a start £750,000 is a joke! There were moves to put a footbridge across the A12 a few years ago, which came to nothing, but the main stumbling block was cost and broad estimates were £4.0 million then. Say It As It Is OK?
  • Score: -2

3:12pm Wed 19 Feb 14

stevedawson says...

Necessary for the war effort.not necessary for the rowhedge commuter effort.
Necessary for the war effort.not necessary for the rowhedge commuter effort. stevedawson
  • Score: -1

3:27pm Wed 19 Feb 14

Wicky1 says...

It could act as an effective park and train ride into town or further afield if there were sufficient fee car parking at Rowhedge* - Currently folk to the south of town have too drive in down the Mersea Rd/St Botolphs roundabout bottleneck to get to Colchester Town or across town to reach North Station.

* Problem is all the brown belt land (Wahrf etc) is being developed for new housing. However a new cyclepath is on the cards to link up down the Hythe - and the train station there. Bet the Rowhedgians don't fancy commuters turning the village streets into an ad-hoc car park.
It could act as an effective park and train ride into town or further afield if there were sufficient fee car parking at Rowhedge* - Currently folk to the south of town have too drive in down the Mersea Rd/St Botolphs roundabout bottleneck to get to Colchester Town or across town to reach North Station. * Problem is all the brown belt land (Wahrf etc) is being developed for new housing. However a new cyclepath is on the cards to link up down the Hythe - and the train station there. Bet the Rowhedgians don't fancy commuters turning the village streets into an ad-hoc car park. Wicky1
  • Score: 3

4:15pm Wed 19 Feb 14

billygoatgruff says...

Hope it never happens I think the people of both places will be against it,I suggest Mr Niland who has only lived in Rowhedge for 5 years should have moved somewhere with a station on hand!!
Hope it never happens I think the people of both places will be against it,I suggest Mr Niland who has only lived in Rowhedge for 5 years should have moved somewhere with a station on hand!! billygoatgruff
  • Score: 0

5:31pm Wed 19 Feb 14

Douglas Park says...

A footbridge from Rowhedge to Wivenhoe would be certainly advantageous and most welcome, as would a proper riverside trail down to Rowhedge and not one that was dependent on the weather. It's a lovely walk down the river, but the trail on the Rowhedge side turns into a quagmire after a bout of rain. The Alresford creek path from Wivenhoe could also do with an upgrade to make it accessible (without wellies).
A footbridge from Rowhedge to Wivenhoe would be certainly advantageous and most welcome, as would a proper riverside trail down to Rowhedge and not one that was dependent on the weather. It's a lovely walk down the river, but the trail on the Rowhedge side turns into a quagmire after a bout of rain. The Alresford creek path from Wivenhoe could also do with an upgrade to make it accessible (without wellies). Douglas Park
  • Score: -2

6:34pm Wed 19 Feb 14

angryman!!! says...

Would be benificial for both places as well a surrounding areas and stop having traffic having to go through town. Isn't there a proposed development at rowehdge surely that could be part of deal to make a contribution?
Would be benificial for both places as well a surrounding areas and stop having traffic having to go through town. Isn't there a proposed development at rowehdge surely that could be part of deal to make a contribution? angryman!!!
  • Score: -5

7:26pm Wed 19 Feb 14

driver4108 says...

why bother
why bother driver4108
  • Score: 8

1:12am Thu 20 Feb 14

Boris says...

billygoatgruff wrote:
Hope it never happens I think the people of both places will be against it,I suggest Mr Niland who has only lived in Rowhedge for 5 years should have moved somewhere with a station on hand!!
Too right. Rowhedge is blessed by being difficult to commute from. Mr. Niland's stupid bridge would only push house prices up to Wivenhoe levels.
[quote][p][bold]billygoatgruff[/bold] wrote: Hope it never happens I think the people of both places will be against it,I suggest Mr Niland who has only lived in Rowhedge for 5 years should have moved somewhere with a station on hand!![/p][/quote]Too right. Rowhedge is blessed by being difficult to commute from. Mr. Niland's stupid bridge would only push house prices up to Wivenhoe levels. Boris
  • Score: 6

11:11am Thu 20 Feb 14

Douglas Park says...

Wicky1 wrote:
There was a bridge between Ruffedge & Wivenhoe in the early 20th century.

http://www.movablebr

idges.org.uk/BridgeP

age.asp?BridgeNumber

=1062

It was situated in front of the Albion pub, down river from the ferry hard. It was used by troops at Cherry tree camp Blackheath on the Mersea Road, for quick access to the railway at Wivenhoe. Built for the first world war. The centre section worked on a cantilever system to allow barge traffic through to the Hythe.

http://3.bp.blogspot

.com/-wGKbv-1c0hw/Up

XPAcZJ8KI/AAAAAAAAAm

E/Cl8vunNJ0_E/s1600/

PICT0051-001.JPG
Thanks for that link Wicky1. Fascinating to see an old photo of the bridge and read the accounts of the bridge and the visit by the King.

Even more fascinating at how quickly the bridge was built and such a pity that it was removed after the war.
[quote][p][bold]Wicky1[/bold] wrote: There was a bridge between Ruffedge & Wivenhoe in the early 20th century. http://www.movablebr idges.org.uk/BridgeP age.asp?BridgeNumber =1062 It was situated in front of the Albion pub, down river from the ferry hard. It was used by troops at Cherry tree camp Blackheath on the Mersea Road, for quick access to the railway at Wivenhoe. Built for the first world war. The centre section worked on a cantilever system to allow barge traffic through to the Hythe. http://3.bp.blogspot .com/-wGKbv-1c0hw/Up XPAcZJ8KI/AAAAAAAAAm E/Cl8vunNJ0_E/s1600/ PICT0051-001.JPG[/p][/quote]Thanks for that link Wicky1. Fascinating to see an old photo of the bridge and read the accounts of the bridge and the visit by the King. Even more fascinating at how quickly the bridge was built and such a pity that it was removed after the war. Douglas Park
  • Score: -4

5:44pm Thu 20 Feb 14

jamest says...

Boris wrote:
billygoatgruff wrote:
Hope it never happens I think the people of both places will be against it,I suggest Mr Niland who has only lived in Rowhedge for 5 years should have moved somewhere with a station on hand!!
Too right. Rowhedge is blessed by being difficult to commute from. Mr. Niland's stupid bridge would only push house prices up to Wivenhoe levels.
The above!
I moved to Rowhedge for many reasons, one of them being it's not a car clogged commuter village. Parking is already limited in the village and this will just make it worse with 'outsiders' using the village as a car park and then using the bridge to the station.
Both villages like their own individuality.
We do not need another 'heritage hut' debacle please!
[quote][p][bold]Boris[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]billygoatgruff[/bold] wrote: Hope it never happens I think the people of both places will be against it,I suggest Mr Niland who has only lived in Rowhedge for 5 years should have moved somewhere with a station on hand!![/p][/quote]Too right. Rowhedge is blessed by being difficult to commute from. Mr. Niland's stupid bridge would only push house prices up to Wivenhoe levels.[/p][/quote]The above! I moved to Rowhedge for many reasons, one of them being it's not a car clogged commuter village. Parking is already limited in the village and this will just make it worse with 'outsiders' using the village as a car park and then using the bridge to the station. Both villages like their own individuality. We do not need another 'heritage hut' debacle please! jamest
  • Score: -1

7:12pm Thu 20 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

If is put is put in as part of the new housing development on Rowhedge Wharf and goes from there over to Ferry Road, instead of opposite the Albion it would be better. It would also need to be designed in a way to fit the landscape. I saw that someone had mentioned a design that is modelled on the mast of a Thames barge which I believe is part of the sign for east donyland parish. That might make a nice design that would pay homage to the shipbuilding past of the area as well as the new boat building that is going to be going on at the Hythe. If they did all that and built a pay and display car park, or even made Rowhedge a permit parking only , with local residents having their own free permits plus some for day visit passes for guests like they do in other towns, it could work. It is definitely worth looking at in more detail and finding out what all the residents of Rowhedge think about it once all the ins and outs have been put on the table.
If is put is put in as part of the new housing development on Rowhedge Wharf and goes from there over to Ferry Road, instead of opposite the Albion it would be better. It would also need to be designed in a way to fit the landscape. I saw that someone had mentioned a design that is modelled on the mast of a Thames barge which I believe is part of the sign for east donyland parish. That might make a nice design that would pay homage to the shipbuilding past of the area as well as the new boat building that is going to be going on at the Hythe. If they did all that and built a pay and display car park, or even made Rowhedge a permit parking only , with local residents having their own free permits plus some for day visit passes for guests like they do in other towns, it could work. It is definitely worth looking at in more detail and finding out what all the residents of Rowhedge think about it once all the ins and outs have been put on the table. The Wonderer
  • Score: -5

7:45pm Thu 20 Feb 14

Wicky1 says...

The footbridge down at the Hythe built in 2010 cost £250,000 so the estimated cost of £750,000 for a Wivenhoe –Rowhedge bridge must have an expensive hinge!

Looking back in history of bridges down at the Hythe

http://www.british-h
istory.ac.uk/report.
aspx?compid=21992

"Permission to build a footbridge at the Hythe in 1407 was conditional on boats being able to reach East bridge, and a similar provision was made when the footbridge was replaced by a cart bridge in 1473"

"n 1407 the corporation allowed the inhabitants of the Hythe to build a footbridge with handrails over the Colne, provided that it was not wide enough for horses and carts and did not interfere with the navigation to East bridge. (fn. 81) Following some conflict with the corporation, the inhabitants were permitted in 1474 to build a cart bridge of stone or timber. (fn. 82) When the corporation rebuilt Hythe mill c. 1552 it undertook to maintain the bridge; extensive work was carried out in 1619, including lengthening the chain with 31 lb. of iron, presumably to block access to the bridge"

A new Hythe bridge was built in brick with three arches in 1737, the navigation commissioners contributing £50 to the cost. (fn. 96) It was removed in 1837. A new bridge under construction fell down in 1839. (fn. 97) Another timber bridge built soon afterwards was washed away in 1876 and replaced in 1898 by an iron bridge, designed by James S. Cooke. (fn. 98) In 1968 a wider bridge of a concrete deck on steel girders, designed by the borough architect's department, was built diagonally across the river just east of the old one, which was retained for pedestrians. The central government bore three quarters of the cost because the new bridge served a principal road. (fn. 99)

As part of the new bypass road opened in 1933 a new bridge over the Colne 50 ft. in width was built of reinforced concrete. It was believed to be the first two-hinged arch bridge in the country."

Time to drag the south of town inc Rowhedge out of the 14th Century and into the 15th century ;-)
The footbridge down at the Hythe built in 2010 cost £250,000 so the estimated cost of £750,000 for a Wivenhoe –Rowhedge bridge must have an expensive hinge! Looking back in history of bridges down at the Hythe http://www.british-h istory.ac.uk/report. aspx?compid=21992 "Permission to build a footbridge at the Hythe in 1407 was conditional on boats being able to reach East bridge, and a similar provision was made when the footbridge was replaced by a cart bridge in 1473" "n 1407 the corporation allowed the inhabitants of the Hythe to build a footbridge with handrails over the Colne, provided that it was not wide enough for horses and carts and did not interfere with the navigation to East bridge. (fn. 81) Following some conflict with the corporation, the inhabitants were permitted in 1474 to build a cart bridge of stone or timber. (fn. 82) When the corporation rebuilt Hythe mill c. 1552 it undertook to maintain the bridge; extensive work was carried out in 1619, including lengthening the chain with 31 lb. of iron, presumably to block access to the bridge" A new Hythe bridge was built in brick with three arches in 1737, the navigation commissioners contributing £50 to the cost. (fn. 96) It was removed in 1837. A new bridge under construction fell down in 1839. (fn. 97) Another timber bridge built soon afterwards was washed away in 1876 and replaced in 1898 by an iron bridge, designed by James S. Cooke. (fn. 98) In 1968 a wider bridge of a concrete deck on steel girders, designed by the borough architect's department, was built diagonally across the river just east of the old one, which was retained for pedestrians. The central government bore three quarters of the cost because the new bridge served a principal road. (fn. 99) As part of the new bypass road opened in 1933 a new bridge over the Colne 50 ft. in width was built of reinforced concrete. It was believed to be the first two-hinged arch bridge in the country." Time to drag the south of town inc Rowhedge out of the 14th Century and into the 15th century ;-) Wicky1
  • Score: -1

9:02pm Thu 20 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

Those of you that are dead against the idea, is it just because of parking? If it is, I am sure that solutions could be found to resolve this issue with the right planning. Any commuters using the new improved road down to the new housing development where potentially a car park could be introduced to cope with visitors.
Is it the house prices going up? Surely there a lot of local people that would benefit from that, if it was to happen.
Or is it purely because you don't like change?
Those of you that are dead against the idea, is it just because of parking? If it is, I am sure that solutions could be found to resolve this issue with the right planning. Any commuters using the new improved road down to the new housing development where potentially a car park could be introduced to cope with visitors. Is it the house prices going up? Surely there a lot of local people that would benefit from that, if it was to happen. Or is it purely because you don't like change? The Wonderer
  • Score: -6

2:01am Fri 21 Feb 14

Boris says...

The Wonderer wrote:
Those of you that are dead against the idea, is it just because of parking? If it is, I am sure that solutions could be found to resolve this issue with the right planning. Any commuters using the new improved road down to the new housing development where potentially a car park could be introduced to cope with visitors.
Is it the house prices going up? Surely there a lot of local people that would benefit from that, if it was to happen.
Or is it purely because you don't like change?
Nobody benefits from house prices going up, apart from speculators and profiteers. And estate agents.
[quote][p][bold]The Wonderer[/bold] wrote: Those of you that are dead against the idea, is it just because of parking? If it is, I am sure that solutions could be found to resolve this issue with the right planning. Any commuters using the new improved road down to the new housing development where potentially a car park could be introduced to cope with visitors. Is it the house prices going up? Surely there a lot of local people that would benefit from that, if it was to happen. Or is it purely because you don't like change?[/p][/quote]Nobody benefits from house prices going up, apart from speculators and profiteers. And estate agents. Boris
  • Score: 1

7:29am Fri 21 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

Boris wrote:
The Wonderer wrote:
Those of you that are dead against the idea, is it just because of parking? If it is, I am sure that solutions could be found to resolve this issue with the right planning. Any commuters using the new improved road down to the new housing development where potentially a car park could be introduced to cope with visitors.
Is it the house prices going up? Surely there a lot of local people that would benefit from that, if it was to happen.
Or is it purely because you don't like change?
Nobody benefits from house prices going up, apart from speculators and profiteers. And estate agents.
Boris, can you explain that a bit more for me. I don't understand. Why would all the homeowners in Rowhedge not benefit from the value of their homes going up?
[quote][p][bold]Boris[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Wonderer[/bold] wrote: Those of you that are dead against the idea, is it just because of parking? If it is, I am sure that solutions could be found to resolve this issue with the right planning. Any commuters using the new improved road down to the new housing development where potentially a car park could be introduced to cope with visitors. Is it the house prices going up? Surely there a lot of local people that would benefit from that, if it was to happen. Or is it purely because you don't like change?[/p][/quote]Nobody benefits from house prices going up, apart from speculators and profiteers. And estate agents.[/p][/quote]Boris, can you explain that a bit more for me. I don't understand. Why would all the homeowners in Rowhedge not benefit from the value of their homes going up? The Wonderer
  • Score: -2

8:34am Fri 21 Feb 14

DrWhom says...

Ritchie_Hicks wrote:
Wicky1 wrote:
It would certainly benefit South of Colchester if there was a bridge across the Colne. Wouldn't go necessarily for a road bridge but a foot bridge doubling for cycles would allow access for folk to use Wivenhoe's train station, shops and facilities - plus it would help increase the genetic pool….
It would certainly benefit Rowhedge. But where £1million is going to come from, who knows...............
I cant see how this would benefit Wivenhoe - how will boats get under the bridge - will never happen.
[quote][p][bold]Ritchie_Hicks[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Wicky1[/bold] wrote: It would certainly benefit South of Colchester if there was a bridge across the Colne. Wouldn't go necessarily for a road bridge but a foot bridge doubling for cycles would allow access for folk to use Wivenhoe's train station, shops and facilities - plus it would help increase the genetic pool….[/p][/quote]It would certainly benefit Rowhedge. But where £1million is going to come from, who knows...............[/p][/quote]I cant see how this would benefit Wivenhoe - how will boats get under the bridge - will never happen. DrWhom
  • Score: -3

8:35am Fri 21 Feb 14

DrWhom says...

Wicky1 wrote:
It would certainly benefit South of Colchester if there was a bridge across the Colne. Wouldn't go necessarily for a road bridge but a foot bridge doubling for cycles would allow access for folk to use Wivenhoe's train station, shops and facilities - plus it would help increase the genetic pool….
Great so now Rowhedge becomes a free commuter car park for South Colchester
[quote][p][bold]Wicky1[/bold] wrote: It would certainly benefit South of Colchester if there was a bridge across the Colne. Wouldn't go necessarily for a road bridge but a foot bridge doubling for cycles would allow access for folk to use Wivenhoe's train station, shops and facilities - plus it would help increase the genetic pool….[/p][/quote]Great so now Rowhedge becomes a free commuter car park for South Colchester DrWhom
  • Score: -5

10:22am Fri 21 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

Wouldn't everyone benefit from better walking and cycling options. Wouldn't the local shops of Wivenhoe benefit from more customers? Wouldn't both communities benefit from joining forces to enhance facilities for the local people?
Isn't it better to be proactive rather than reactive? Are any of the problems that those of you that are being negative about this proposal unsurmountable?
With the right planning, taking all issues into account, would this not be good thing for both Wivenhoe and Rowhedge?
Wouldn't everyone benefit from better walking and cycling options. Wouldn't the local shops of Wivenhoe benefit from more customers? Wouldn't both communities benefit from joining forces to enhance facilities for the local people? Isn't it better to be proactive rather than reactive? Are any of the problems that those of you that are being negative about this proposal unsurmountable? With the right planning, taking all issues into account, would this not be good thing for both Wivenhoe and Rowhedge? The Wonderer
  • Score: -3

10:52am Fri 21 Feb 14

Ritchie_Hicks says...

The Wonderer wrote:
Wouldn't everyone benefit from better walking and cycling options. Wouldn't the local shops of Wivenhoe benefit from more customers? Wouldn't both communities benefit from joining forces to enhance facilities for the local people?
Isn't it better to be proactive rather than reactive? Are any of the problems that those of you that are being negative about this proposal unsurmountable?
With the right planning, taking all issues into account, would this not be good thing for both Wivenhoe and Rowhedge?
This is all pie in the sky - it won't happen.
[quote][p][bold]The Wonderer[/bold] wrote: Wouldn't everyone benefit from better walking and cycling options. Wouldn't the local shops of Wivenhoe benefit from more customers? Wouldn't both communities benefit from joining forces to enhance facilities for the local people? Isn't it better to be proactive rather than reactive? Are any of the problems that those of you that are being negative about this proposal unsurmountable? With the right planning, taking all issues into account, would this not be good thing for both Wivenhoe and Rowhedge?[/p][/quote]This is all pie in the sky - it won't happen. Ritchie_Hicks
  • Score: 1

12:39pm Fri 21 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

I really like pies! @jamest mentioned the Rowhedge Heritage Hut debacle.

Having just read through the past articles on this, I can understand. I think it was the right decision to keep that piece of land open. But what if a new hut could be built as part of the new development. A hut that was linked to a pay and display car park and had storage space for kayaks and canoes so local people had somewhere to put them that was safe. It may be pie in the sky, but Captain Sensible said, 'if you don't have a dream, how do you have a dream come true?'
I really like pies! @jamest mentioned the Rowhedge Heritage Hut debacle. Having just read through the past articles on this, I can understand. I think it was the right decision to keep that piece of land open. But what if a new hut could be built as part of the new development. A hut that was linked to a pay and display car park and had storage space for kayaks and canoes so local people had somewhere to put them that was safe. It may be pie in the sky, but Captain Sensible said, 'if you don't have a dream, how do you have a dream come true?' The Wonderer
  • Score: -4

12:53pm Fri 21 Feb 14

stevedawson says...

Such a wonderful series of bridge facts on here.the old burgers of the town seemed to be just as useless as those we elect today.
Such a wonderful series of bridge facts on here.the old burgers of the town seemed to be just as useless as those we elect today. stevedawson
  • Score: 0

1:52pm Fri 21 Feb 14

romantic says...

The Wonderer wrote:
I really like pies! @jamest mentioned the Rowhedge Heritage Hut debacle.

Having just read through the past articles on this, I can understand. I think it was the right decision to keep that piece of land open. But what if a new hut could be built as part of the new development. A hut that was linked to a pay and display car park and had storage space for kayaks and canoes so local people had somewhere to put them that was safe. It may be pie in the sky, but Captain Sensible said, 'if you don't have a dream, how do you have a dream come true?'
Pinched from "South Pacific" by Rodgers and Hammerstein!
[quote][p][bold]The Wonderer[/bold] wrote: I really like pies! @jamest mentioned the Rowhedge Heritage Hut debacle. Having just read through the past articles on this, I can understand. I think it was the right decision to keep that piece of land open. But what if a new hut could be built as part of the new development. A hut that was linked to a pay and display car park and had storage space for kayaks and canoes so local people had somewhere to put them that was safe. It may be pie in the sky, but Captain Sensible said, 'if you don't have a dream, how do you have a dream come true?'[/p][/quote]Pinched from "South Pacific" by Rodgers and Hammerstein! romantic
  • Score: -1

6:04pm Fri 21 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

How many commuters from areas outside of Rowhedge would actually use the bridge to access Wivenhoe station? Wouldn't they be better off using the Colchester Stations, particularly North Station that has faster more direct trains? Are you worrying about nothing?
How many commuters from areas outside of Rowhedge would actually use the bridge to access Wivenhoe station? Wouldn't they be better off using the Colchester Stations, particularly North Station that has faster more direct trains? Are you worrying about nothing? The Wonderer
  • Score: -1

7:31pm Fri 21 Feb 14

Boris says...

The Wonderer wrote:
Boris wrote:
The Wonderer wrote:
Those of you that are dead against the idea, is it just because of parking? If it is, I am sure that solutions could be found to resolve this issue with the right planning. Any commuters using the new improved road down to the new housing development where potentially a car park could be introduced to cope with visitors.
Is it the house prices going up? Surely there a lot of local people that would benefit from that, if it was to happen.
Or is it purely because you don't like change?
Nobody benefits from house prices going up, apart from speculators and profiteers. And estate agents.
Boris, can you explain that a bit more for me. I don't understand. Why would all the homeowners in Rowhedge not benefit from the value of their homes going up?
It's not just Rowhedge, it'as the whole country. For most people, rising hoiuse prices give the illusion of wealth, but you can't spend that money, because to do so you must sell your house. Hign house prices mean young people can't afford to buy, and since most of the council houses have been sold off, they can't rent either, except privately, from buy-to-let landlords. And what do these landlords do? Because they use the rents from their houses to buy more houses, they push rents up, to meet the higher house pricxes. So most tenants will never be able to save enough for a deposit on a house of their own. It is all utter madness.
That is why nobody benefits from higher house prices, except for speculators and estate agents. Of course if you are a speculator or an estate agent, you will see things differently.
[quote][p][bold]The Wonderer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boris[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Wonderer[/bold] wrote: Those of you that are dead against the idea, is it just because of parking? If it is, I am sure that solutions could be found to resolve this issue with the right planning. Any commuters using the new improved road down to the new housing development where potentially a car park could be introduced to cope with visitors. Is it the house prices going up? Surely there a lot of local people that would benefit from that, if it was to happen. Or is it purely because you don't like change?[/p][/quote]Nobody benefits from house prices going up, apart from speculators and profiteers. And estate agents.[/p][/quote]Boris, can you explain that a bit more for me. I don't understand. Why would all the homeowners in Rowhedge not benefit from the value of their homes going up?[/p][/quote]It's not just Rowhedge, it'as the whole country. For most people, rising hoiuse prices give the illusion of wealth, but you can't spend that money, because to do so you must sell your house. Hign house prices mean young people can't afford to buy, and since most of the council houses have been sold off, they can't rent either, except privately, from buy-to-let landlords. And what do these landlords do? Because they use the rents from their houses to buy more houses, they push rents up, to meet the higher house pricxes. So most tenants will never be able to save enough for a deposit on a house of their own. It is all utter madness. That is why nobody benefits from higher house prices, except for speculators and estate agents. Of course if you are a speculator or an estate agent, you will see things differently. Boris
  • Score: 0

8:35pm Fri 21 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

Thank you for the explanation Boris. I agree with you on the national house prices, but are we not just talking about a localised increase? Yes it may prevent some first time buyers from being able to buy in this area, but they could buy somewhere else where the prices are lower. They could then work there way up the ladder to buy in Rowhedge if they so wish.

Building more affordable homes is something that definitely needs to be done. However, should Rowhedge and Wivenhoe be denied a footbridge just so first time buyers can buy their first home in Rowhedge?
Thank you for the explanation Boris. I agree with you on the national house prices, but are we not just talking about a localised increase? Yes it may prevent some first time buyers from being able to buy in this area, but they could buy somewhere else where the prices are lower. They could then work there way up the ladder to buy in Rowhedge if they so wish. Building more affordable homes is something that definitely needs to be done. However, should Rowhedge and Wivenhoe be denied a footbridge just so first time buyers can buy their first home in Rowhedge? The Wonderer
  • Score: -1

9:13pm Fri 21 Feb 14

colchester300yrs says...

"Wouldn't everyone benefit from better walking and cycling options. Wouldn't the local shops of Wivenhoe benefit from more customers? Wouldn't both communities benefit from joining forces to enhance facilities for the local people?"

Of course it will, but that is NOT what such a crossing will achieve. All this will achieve is parking for London commuters. No one ever goes to Rowhedge for any other reason (apart from those who are lucky enough to live in such a relatively disconnected place)

Furthermore, you all seem to forget that the sea cadets have a 700 ton lightvessel moored upstream. It was built in 1952 and came to the Hythe in 1992. It will not last forever. If any preservation on it is required, so will a dry dock be required. Therefore any bridge at Rowhedge MUST be able to allow this vessel out (if only for scrapping), and that means 150 feet clear under any bridge at high tide, unless Colchester wants a rusting hulk dumped in the river (in about 100 years time).Such a solution is not illustrated in this article.
"Wouldn't everyone benefit from better walking and cycling options. Wouldn't the local shops of Wivenhoe benefit from more customers? Wouldn't both communities benefit from joining forces to enhance facilities for the local people?" Of course it will, but that is NOT what such a crossing will achieve. All this will achieve is parking for London commuters. No one ever goes to Rowhedge for any other reason (apart from those who are lucky enough to live in such a relatively disconnected place) Furthermore, you all seem to forget that the sea cadets have a 700 ton lightvessel moored upstream. It was built in 1952 and came to the Hythe in 1992. It will not last forever. If any preservation on it is required, so will a dry dock be required. Therefore any bridge at Rowhedge MUST be able to allow this vessel out (if only for scrapping), and that means 150 feet clear under any bridge at high tide, unless Colchester wants a rusting hulk dumped in the river (in about 100 years time).Such a solution is not illustrated in this article. colchester300yrs
  • Score: 1

9:39pm Fri 21 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

@colchester300yrs, it has already been mentioned that it is unlikely that many people would drive into rowhedge to commute to London.

Moveable bridges have been around for a long time now. There even used to be one in Rowhedge, and a moveable train bridge just a short distance further down the river. Sure, in the 21st century we could produce something to allow all kinds of vessels up and down the river.

As for walking, there are many people that walk and ride down the river. I have even seen the walk already written in a guide book, but it relied on the foot ferry to link up the circular walk. A foot ferry that runs on weekends with the high tide during the summer. Should we not be promoting more outdoor activities that improve health?
@colchester300yrs, it has already been mentioned that it is unlikely that many people would drive into rowhedge to commute to London. Moveable bridges have been around for a long time now. There even used to be one in Rowhedge, and a moveable train bridge just a short distance further down the river. Sure, in the 21st century we could produce something to allow all kinds of vessels up and down the river. As for walking, there are many people that walk and ride down the river. I have even seen the walk already written in a guide book, but it relied on the foot ferry to link up the circular walk. A foot ferry that runs on weekends with the high tide during the summer. Should we not be promoting more outdoor activities that improve health? The Wonderer
  • Score: 1

11:00pm Fri 21 Feb 14

Boris says...

The Wonderer wrote:
Thank you for the explanation Boris. I agree with you on the national house prices, but are we not just talking about a localised increase? Yes it may prevent some first time buyers from being able to buy in this area, but they could buy somewhere else where the prices are lower. They could then work there way up the ladder to buy in Rowhedge if they so wish.

Building more affordable homes is something that definitely needs to be done. However, should Rowhedge and Wivenhoe be denied a footbridge just so first time buyers can buy their first home in Rowhedge?
Interesting idea, that people should need to work their way up the property ladder to live in the exclusivity of Rowhedge. Why should they have to do that? Let the sons and daughters of Rowhedge people live in their home village, if they wish.
Actually a better case could be made for the footbridge if you could guarantee that no Wivenhoe commuters would park in Rowhedge. If you know Rowhedge, you will know that there is nowhere for outsiders to park, except maybe Rectory Road. To keep the commuters out, the whole village would have to be made a residents-only parking area. Permits would cost £55 per year per car. Is there an appetite for that? I suspect not.
Villages are different from the town. Let's keep them that way.
[quote][p][bold]The Wonderer[/bold] wrote: Thank you for the explanation Boris. I agree with you on the national house prices, but are we not just talking about a localised increase? Yes it may prevent some first time buyers from being able to buy in this area, but they could buy somewhere else where the prices are lower. They could then work there way up the ladder to buy in Rowhedge if they so wish. Building more affordable homes is something that definitely needs to be done. However, should Rowhedge and Wivenhoe be denied a footbridge just so first time buyers can buy their first home in Rowhedge?[/p][/quote]Interesting idea, that people should need to work their way up the property ladder to live in the exclusivity of Rowhedge. Why should they have to do that? Let the sons and daughters of Rowhedge people live in their home village, if they wish. Actually a better case could be made for the footbridge if you could guarantee that no Wivenhoe commuters would park in Rowhedge. If you know Rowhedge, you will know that there is nowhere for outsiders to park, except maybe Rectory Road. To keep the commuters out, the whole village would have to be made a residents-only parking area. Permits would cost £55 per year per car. Is there an appetite for that? I suspect not. Villages are different from the town. Let's keep them that way. Boris
  • Score: 4

7:37am Sat 22 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

Why would permits cost £55 Boris? Is this the administrative cost? Do you know this for certain?

I guess it would need to cost something but it would be better if the local people recieved a free permit fo one car per household. With additional paper permits with dates that can be scratched out like they use in Brighton, that can be bought from the council, to be used by guests. .

It is a quaint idea to keep Rowhedge for the local villagers. There are places in England that they do try and do just that. In the National Park of the Lake District there are certain homes that are only possible to buy if you are from the area. If the people of Rowhedge feel so strongly about this then maybe they can look into a scheme like this.
Why would permits cost £55 Boris? Is this the administrative cost? Do you know this for certain? I guess it would need to cost something but it would be better if the local people recieved a free permit fo one car per household. With additional paper permits with dates that can be scratched out like they use in Brighton, that can be bought from the council, to be used by guests. . It is a quaint idea to keep Rowhedge for the local villagers. There are places in England that they do try and do just that. In the National Park of the Lake District there are certain homes that are only possible to buy if you are from the area. If the people of Rowhedge feel so strongly about this then maybe they can look into a scheme like this. The Wonderer
  • Score: 1

7:55am Sat 22 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

I think we exhausted all the arguments on this as we have begun repeating ourselves. I guess it comes down to how many people will benefit and how many will lose out. As we live in a democracy, if the benefits out way the losses, and the money is there, then the bridge should be built. If not then it shouldn't.
I think we exhausted all the arguments on this as we have begun repeating ourselves. I guess it comes down to how many people will benefit and how many will lose out. As we live in a democracy, if the benefits out way the losses, and the money is there, then the bridge should be built. If not then it shouldn't. The Wonderer
  • Score: 0

8:03am Sat 22 Feb 14

jamest says...

Welcome to Rowhedge Car Park Village. We have a bridge we don't want and we now pay to park outside our house (if you can find a space).
Welcome to Rowhedge Car Park Village. We have a bridge we don't want and we now pay to park outside our house (if you can find a space). jamest
  • Score: 0

8:13am Sat 22 Feb 14

Wicky1 says...

If you look at a map there is a backroad accessing the wharf from the top of Rectory Rd - in its heyday this allowed trucks to bypass the village - There is plenty of space around this area to build a car park for folk which would keep any extra raffic out of Rowhedge village's roads.

If the swing foot/cycle bridge was built at the Wharf linking over to Old Ferry Rd over in Wivenhoe there would be minimal disruption for Rowhedge from commuters.

Building secure sheltered cycle parking at Wivenhoe train station would encourage more cycle users.
If you look at a map there is a backroad accessing the wharf from the top of Rectory Rd - in its heyday this allowed trucks to bypass the village - There is plenty of space around this area to build a car park for folk which would keep any extra raffic out of Rowhedge village's roads. If the swing foot/cycle bridge was built at the Wharf linking over to Old Ferry Rd over in Wivenhoe there would be minimal disruption for Rowhedge from commuters. Building secure sheltered cycle parking at Wivenhoe train station would encourage more cycle users. Wicky1
  • Score: 0

11:55am Sat 22 Feb 14

Boris says...

The Wonderer wrote:
Why would permits cost £55 Boris? Is this the administrative cost? Do you know this for certain?

I guess it would need to cost something but it would be better if the local people recieved a free permit fo one car per household. With additional paper permits with dates that can be scratched out like they use in Brighton, that can be bought from the council, to be used by guests. .

It is a quaint idea to keep Rowhedge for the local villagers. There are places in England that they do try and do just that. In the National Park of the Lake District there are certain homes that are only possible to buy if you are from the area. If the people of Rowhedge feel so strongly about this then maybe they can look into a scheme like this.
I know because I live close to Colchester town centre in a residents parking area. Last April I paid £52 to park outside my own home, and this April it will be £55. It will no doubt continue rising by a few pounds each year. The charge is the same for all residents parking schemes in Colchester Borough, of which Rowhedge is a part. Only CBC is allowed to run residents parking schemes. You could run your own scheme I suppose, but it would have no legal backing and you would not be able to fine transgressors. Your High Street, and Rectory Road, would be festooned with commuters' cars all day long.
[quote][p][bold]The Wonderer[/bold] wrote: Why would permits cost £55 Boris? Is this the administrative cost? Do you know this for certain? I guess it would need to cost something but it would be better if the local people recieved a free permit fo one car per household. With additional paper permits with dates that can be scratched out like they use in Brighton, that can be bought from the council, to be used by guests. . It is a quaint idea to keep Rowhedge for the local villagers. There are places in England that they do try and do just that. In the National Park of the Lake District there are certain homes that are only possible to buy if you are from the area. If the people of Rowhedge feel so strongly about this then maybe they can look into a scheme like this.[/p][/quote]I know because I live close to Colchester town centre in a residents parking area. Last April I paid £52 to park outside my own home, and this April it will be £55. It will no doubt continue rising by a few pounds each year. The charge is the same for all residents parking schemes in Colchester Borough, of which Rowhedge is a part. Only CBC is allowed to run residents parking schemes. You could run your own scheme I suppose, but it would have no legal backing and you would not be able to fine transgressors. Your High Street, and Rectory Road, would be festooned with commuters' cars all day long. Boris
  • Score: 4

1:03pm Sat 22 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

The local parish council can make a decision on the parking permits. If there was a toll for the bridge then maybe funds from this could pay for the parking permits. Whatever they decide I am sure it will be part of a consultation process with residents. They can then decide where the money comes from for the parking permits.
The local parish council can make a decision on the parking permits. If there was a toll for the bridge then maybe funds from this could pay for the parking permits. Whatever they decide I am sure it will be part of a consultation process with residents. They can then decide where the money comes from for the parking permits. The Wonderer
  • Score: 0

3:36pm Sat 22 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

Fronton and Walton Charge £20 for their 12 month permits, and the Tendring District Council have given away free parking permits to local residents for three years in a row. #anythingispossible
http://www.tendringd
c.gov.uk/node/6555
Fronton and Walton Charge £20 for their 12 month permits, and the Tendring District Council have given away free parking permits to local residents for three years in a row. #anythingispossible http://www.tendringd c.gov.uk/node/6555 The Wonderer
  • Score: -2

4:38pm Sat 22 Feb 14

Boris says...

The Wonderer wrote:
Fronton and Walton Charge £20 for their 12 month permits, and the Tendring District Council have given away free parking permits to local residents for three years in a row. #anythingispossible
http://www.tendringd

c.gov.uk/node/6555
So what? Rowhedge is not in Tendring.
.
And, while TDC residents may get cheap or free parking, they have until now had no garden waste collections. They are going to have them now, but they will have to pay for them, and for the receptacle to accumulate the waste in. Meanwhile all that is free in the CBC area, and quite right too. So, it's swings and roundabouts.
[quote][p][bold]The Wonderer[/bold] wrote: Fronton and Walton Charge £20 for their 12 month permits, and the Tendring District Council have given away free parking permits to local residents for three years in a row. #anythingispossible http://www.tendringd c.gov.uk/node/6555[/p][/quote]So what? Rowhedge is not in Tendring. . And, while TDC residents may get cheap or free parking, they have until now had no garden waste collections. They are going to have them now, but they will have to pay for them, and for the receptacle to accumulate the waste in. Meanwhile all that is free in the CBC area, and quite right too. So, it's swings and roundabouts. Boris
  • Score: 0

4:43pm Sat 22 Feb 14

Boris says...

The Wonderer wrote:
The local parish council can make a decision on the parking permits. If there was a toll for the bridge then maybe funds from this could pay for the parking permits. Whatever they decide I am sure it will be part of a consultation process with residents. They can then decide where the money comes from for the parking permits.
If you live in Rowhedge, you can take part in that consultation process.. Maybe you could stand for election to the parish council and help get the bridge scheme agreed.
If you don't live there, then you will have to leave it to the locals to decide. But remember that the recent history of public consultations in Rowhedge is somewhat chequered.
[quote][p][bold]The Wonderer[/bold] wrote: The local parish council can make a decision on the parking permits. If there was a toll for the bridge then maybe funds from this could pay for the parking permits. Whatever they decide I am sure it will be part of a consultation process with residents. They can then decide where the money comes from for the parking permits.[/p][/quote]If you live in Rowhedge, you can take part in that consultation process.. Maybe you could stand for election to the parish council and help get the bridge scheme agreed. If you don't live there, then you will have to leave it to the locals to decide. But remember that the recent history of public consultations in Rowhedge is somewhat chequered. Boris
  • Score: 1

11:10pm Sat 22 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

The point is that the council could choose to charge a small amount or nothing at all. It is yet to be decided.

Public enquiries are not easy, but necessary for things like this. At the end of it a decision will be made depending on the outcome.

I suppose, Boris, you are referring to the Heritage Hut. As far as I am aware this is still ongoing. Maybe they will be able to build their hut in the new car park then everyone, except for those that resist change, will be happy.

What I can't understand is why people are negative about things that actually can have a very positive impact on people's lives. The are a lot of positives that come from building a bridge, and yet some people are still fixed on the couple of possible negative outcomes. Possible is the key word here. It is only a possibility that house prices will rise or commuters will park in the village. Yet there are many positive outcomes that are definite outcomes. It is definite that youngsters will be able to walk over to the park or library with their parents. It is definite that people will be able to enjoy a circular walk up and down the river. It is definite that people will have access to the train station so they can walk over the bridge for a day trip to Clacton to enjoy the beach and pier or visit relatives. It is definite that it will build closer relations between the two communities. I could go on.

Why are you so negative about a possible bridge? It cannot be parking, as I have mentioned possible solutions for this. Maybe you have a teenage son or daughter that might wish to buy a house in the village in the future and you are scared that prices will go up. Have you asked them if they will actually want to stay in the area? They might prefer to live in a town or city where there will be more jobs. Even if they did want to stay, house prices might not go up anyway.

Why be negative when positive feelings are so much better?

"Positive anything is better than negative nothing" Elbert Hubbard

"I've had a lot of worries in my life, most of which never happened" Mark Twain

"Once you replace negative thoughts with positive ones, you'll start having positive results." Willie Nelson
The point is that the council could choose to charge a small amount or nothing at all. It is yet to be decided. Public enquiries are not easy, but necessary for things like this. At the end of it a decision will be made depending on the outcome. I suppose, Boris, you are referring to the Heritage Hut. As far as I am aware this is still ongoing. Maybe they will be able to build their hut in the new car park then everyone, except for those that resist change, will be happy. What I can't understand is why people are negative about things that actually can have a very positive impact on people's lives. The are a lot of positives that come from building a bridge, and yet some people are still fixed on the couple of possible negative outcomes. Possible is the key word here. It is only a possibility that house prices will rise or commuters will park in the village. Yet there are many positive outcomes that are definite outcomes. It is definite that youngsters will be able to walk over to the park or library with their parents. It is definite that people will be able to enjoy a circular walk up and down the river. It is definite that people will have access to the train station so they can walk over the bridge for a day trip to Clacton to enjoy the beach and pier or visit relatives. It is definite that it will build closer relations between the two communities. I could go on. Why are you so negative about a possible bridge? It cannot be parking, as I have mentioned possible solutions for this. Maybe you have a teenage son or daughter that might wish to buy a house in the village in the future and you are scared that prices will go up. Have you asked them if they will actually want to stay in the area? They might prefer to live in a town or city where there will be more jobs. Even if they did want to stay, house prices might not go up anyway. Why be negative when positive feelings are so much better? "Positive anything is better than negative nothing" Elbert Hubbard "I've had a lot of worries in my life, most of which never happened" Mark Twain "Once you replace negative thoughts with positive ones, you'll start having positive results." Willie Nelson The Wonderer
  • Score: -5

1:14pm Sun 23 Feb 14

Boris says...

Wonderer, I am getting bored with you banging on about this bridge, while carefully refusing to state your own interest - if any - in Rowhedge. Your arrogant assertion that anyone who disagrees with you is being negative reminds me of Jess Jephcott at his worst.
.
This thread has pretty much run its course. Nobody else seems to be posting to it now, apart from you and me. From now on, you are probably on your own.
Wonderer, I am getting bored with you banging on about this bridge, while carefully refusing to state your own interest - if any - in Rowhedge. Your arrogant assertion that anyone who disagrees with you is being negative reminds me of Jess Jephcott at his worst. . This thread has pretty much run its course. Nobody else seems to be posting to it now, apart from you and me. From now on, you are probably on your own. Boris
  • Score: 2

5:41pm Sun 23 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

If I am coming over as being arrogant, then this will be my last post. I thought I was taking part in a discussion on a bridge that, from conversations I have had with many friends in Wivenhoe, Rowhedge and The Colchester area, that I was actually speaking on behalf of them and not for my own self importance.

I would love to be able to spend a Sunday cycling along my local river spending some time in Wivenhoe visiting friends and some time in Rowhedge. A sentiment shared by many of my friends who also live on the River. A bridge would open up a lot of walking possibilities too for many people to enjoy as well as the many other benefits.

I enjoyed discussing this with you even if you did not.

All the best!
If I am coming over as being arrogant, then this will be my last post. I thought I was taking part in a discussion on a bridge that, from conversations I have had with many friends in Wivenhoe, Rowhedge and The Colchester area, that I was actually speaking on behalf of them and not for my own self importance. I would love to be able to spend a Sunday cycling along my local river spending some time in Wivenhoe visiting friends and some time in Rowhedge. A sentiment shared by many of my friends who also live on the River. A bridge would open up a lot of walking possibilities too for many people to enjoy as well as the many other benefits. I enjoyed discussing this with you even if you did not. All the best! The Wonderer
  • Score: 1

10:50pm Sun 23 Feb 14

Boris says...

The Wonderer wrote:
If I am coming over as being arrogant, then this will be my last post. I thought I was taking part in a discussion on a bridge that, from conversations I have had with many friends in Wivenhoe, Rowhedge and The Colchester area, that I was actually speaking on behalf of them and not for my own self importance.

I would love to be able to spend a Sunday cycling along my local river spending some time in Wivenhoe visiting friends and some time in Rowhedge. A sentiment shared by many of my friends who also live on the River. A bridge would open up a lot of walking possibilities too for many people to enjoy as well as the many other benefits.

I enjoyed discussing this with you even if you did not.

All the best!
I am sorry if I have upset you, Wonderer. Unfortunately your tactic of accusing me of being negative, just because I disagreed with you, mirrors that used by the aforementioned Jess Jephcott, alias Sdapeze, who like me is a prolific contributor to these threads, and the Gazette's undisputed champion wind-up merchant. So your accusation really got up my nose.
I also enjoyed our debate, but - as you yourself wrote yesterday at 07h55 - we have exhausted all the arguments. All the best to you, too.
[quote][p][bold]The Wonderer[/bold] wrote: If I am coming over as being arrogant, then this will be my last post. I thought I was taking part in a discussion on a bridge that, from conversations I have had with many friends in Wivenhoe, Rowhedge and The Colchester area, that I was actually speaking on behalf of them and not for my own self importance. I would love to be able to spend a Sunday cycling along my local river spending some time in Wivenhoe visiting friends and some time in Rowhedge. A sentiment shared by many of my friends who also live on the River. A bridge would open up a lot of walking possibilities too for many people to enjoy as well as the many other benefits. I enjoyed discussing this with you even if you did not. All the best![/p][/quote]I am sorry if I have upset you, Wonderer. Unfortunately your tactic of accusing me of being negative, just because I disagreed with you, mirrors that used by the aforementioned Jess Jephcott, alias Sdapeze, who like me is a prolific contributor to these threads, and the Gazette's undisputed champion wind-up merchant. So your accusation really got up my nose. I also enjoyed our debate, but - as you yourself wrote yesterday at 07h55 - we have exhausted all the arguments. All the best to you, too. Boris
  • Score: 1

9:26am Mon 24 Feb 14

stevedawson says...

Just proves reading on here how hard it is to get an egreement on anything in a democracy.
Just proves reading on here how hard it is to get an egreement on anything in a democracy. stevedawson
  • Score: 0

9:32am Mon 24 Feb 14

Wicky1 says...

Is Wivenhoe home to the big-enders and Rowhedge the little-enders?
Is Wivenhoe home to the big-enders and Rowhedge the little-enders? Wicky1
  • Score: 0

12:40pm Mon 24 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

How do you eat yours Wicky1?

@stevedawson, not everyone needs to agree for a decision to be made, the decision is made by the majority. If more people want it that don't then there will be a bridge.
How do you eat yours Wicky1? @stevedawson, not everyone needs to agree for a decision to be made, the decision is made by the majority. If more people want it that don't then there will be a bridge. The Wonderer
  • Score: 0

12:56pm Mon 24 Feb 14

Wicky1 says...

@The Wonderer Hard to say, I've got a foot in each camp knowing folk on each side literally. Personally I like the yolk runny...

Does a decision to build it depend on say so of residents? CBC has a history of doing stuff that overrides any opposition (i.e VAF, Mile End development) , that's even if they offer consultation, like the court house at St Botolph's that just appeared.

At least a bridge is something different from the acres of 2 bedroom flats that are in vogue and will have utility for many.
@The Wonderer Hard to say, I've got a foot in each camp knowing folk on each side literally. Personally I like the yolk runny... Does a decision to build it depend on say so of residents? CBC has a history of doing stuff that overrides any opposition (i.e VAF, Mile End development) , that's even if they offer consultation, like the court house at St Botolph's that just appeared. At least a bridge is something different from the acres of 2 bedroom flats that are in vogue and will have utility for many. Wicky1
  • Score: 0

12:56pm Mon 24 Feb 14

Ritchie_Hicks says...

The Wonderer wrote:
How do you eat yours Wicky1?

@stevedawson, not everyone needs to agree for a decision to be made, the decision is made by the majority. If more people want it that don't then there will be a bridge.
The majority of people would love to stop paying income tax on their salaries, but that's not going to happen in this 'democracy'.

At £750,000 (estimated - probably more than that when the real cost is calculated) I'm fairly certain Essex Country Council will say there are better projects to spend the money on.

Of course, funding may be found elsewhere, but in reality this bridge is going to benefit the few for a large outlay.
[quote][p][bold]The Wonderer[/bold] wrote: How do you eat yours Wicky1? @stevedawson, not everyone needs to agree for a decision to be made, the decision is made by the majority. If more people want it that don't then there will be a bridge.[/p][/quote]The majority of people would love to stop paying income tax on their salaries, but that's not going to happen in this 'democracy'. At £750,000 (estimated - probably more than that when the real cost is calculated) I'm fairly certain Essex Country Council will say there are better projects to spend the money on. Of course, funding may be found elsewhere, but in reality this bridge is going to benefit the few for a large outlay. Ritchie_Hicks
  • Score: 1

8:35am Tue 25 Feb 14

The Wonderer says...

I wonder how it will affect Rowhedge as a place? Will a bridge change the people in the village? Maybe it will attract a different sort of person to live in the village. Would this be good or bad?
I wonder how it will affect Rowhedge as a place? Will a bridge change the people in the village? Maybe it will attract a different sort of person to live in the village. Would this be good or bad? The Wonderer
  • Score: -1

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