Parents' petition against parking proposals

Essex County Standard: Parent Sam Hempstead with headteacher Clive Reynolds and other parents concerned about the council's parking proposals. Parent Sam Hempstead with headteacher Clive Reynolds and other parents concerned about the council's parking proposals.

PARENTS fear proposed parking restrictions could cause chaos at a Colchester primary school.

A residents’ parking scheme on Constantine Road could be extended to run from 8am to 6pm on weekdays.

The restrictions, which would also apply to other nearby streets, are being looked at by Colchester Council as part of a review of schemes across the town.

But there are fears the changes will leave parents nowhere to pull over when dropping off and picking up children from Hamilton Primary School, which is also on the road.

To comment on the proposals e-mail parking@colchester.gov.uk or write to Colchester Residents' Parking Review, North Essex Parking Partnership, PO Box 5575, Town Hall, Colchester, CO1 9LT by Monday February 17.

  • Read the full story in today's Gazette.

Comments (14)

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9:05am Thu 13 Feb 14

Colchester Castle says...

St John's Green Primary has a parking restriction surrounding it. Parent's have managed to cope with it for years.

It just requires common sense from the parents and Council. Parents not to park on zig-zigs or double yellows and parking wardens not to target parents for 10 minutes in the morning and 10 minutes in the afternoon.
St John's Green Primary has a parking restriction surrounding it. Parent's have managed to cope with it for years. It just requires common sense from the parents and Council. Parents not to park on zig-zigs or double yellows and parking wardens not to target parents for 10 minutes in the morning and 10 minutes in the afternoon. Colchester Castle

9:39am Thu 13 Feb 14

LeQueen says...

Walking to school is all very well but most people need to drop off and get straight to work. We need to accept that the car is here to stay, parking is needed and we can't pretend it isn't. How about the school opening the playground as a drive through and drop off?
Walking to school is all very well but most people need to drop off and get straight to work. We need to accept that the car is here to stay, parking is needed and we can't pretend it isn't. How about the school opening the playground as a drive through and drop off? LeQueen

9:40am Thu 13 Feb 14

siteman says...

Have they lost the use of their legs?
Have they lost the use of their legs? siteman

10:09am Thu 13 Feb 14

wardyt says...

Stop being lazy and walk.
Stop being lazy and walk. wardyt

10:18am Thu 13 Feb 14

Scoot says...

Very true Lequeen some do need to drop off and then get to work, but how many actually just use their cars because they can't be ar5ed to walk ? I've seen a parent (at another school ) jump in their car and drive the 100m to school, drop their kid off and drive back again...they even once made their kid walk whilst driving alongside !! I have also been a resident in a (short term)restricted zone and not been able to park in the same street because a parent has parked up and gone off into town to do some shopping etc etc before or after dropping off/picking up their kids. There does perhaps need to be a rethink, maybe have restricted parking all day except say 08.15-08.45 and say 14.45-15.15 .
Very true Lequeen some do need to drop off and then get to work, but how many actually just use their cars because they can't be ar5ed to walk ? I've seen a parent (at another school ) jump in their car and drive the 100m to school, drop their kid off and drive back again...they even once made their kid walk whilst driving alongside !! I have also been a resident in a (short term)restricted zone and not been able to park in the same street because a parent has parked up and gone off into town to do some shopping etc etc before or after dropping off/picking up their kids. There does perhaps need to be a rethink, maybe have restricted parking all day except say 08.15-08.45 and say 14.45-15.15 . Scoot

10:19am Thu 13 Feb 14

Say It As It Is OK? says...

LeQueen wrote:
Walking to school is all very well but most people need to drop off and get straight to work. We need to accept that the car is here to stay, parking is needed and we can't pretend it isn't. How about the school opening the playground as a drive through and drop off?
What a brilliant idea, why not make the drive though under cover and heated so the little darlings won't get wet.

The comment from Siteman is the most appropriate and LeQueen, your comment about parking attendants and using common sense to allow 10 minutes is a good idea but you are forgetting their 'jobsworth' training does not include common sense!
[quote][p][bold]LeQueen[/bold] wrote: Walking to school is all very well but most people need to drop off and get straight to work. We need to accept that the car is here to stay, parking is needed and we can't pretend it isn't. How about the school opening the playground as a drive through and drop off?[/p][/quote]What a brilliant idea, why not make the drive though under cover and heated so the little darlings won't get wet. The comment from Siteman is the most appropriate and LeQueen, your comment about parking attendants and using common sense to allow 10 minutes is a good idea but you are forgetting their 'jobsworth' training does not include common sense! Say It As It Is OK?

10:59am Thu 13 Feb 14

romantic says...

If your kid lives within, say, a mile of the school, they should be walking there anyway! When I grew up in what was apparently a fairly rough council estate, we all walked to school from the age of about 6. We were walked by parents the first couple of days, just to make sure we'd be OK, and I'm sure they followed for another couple, but then we were on our own. It teaches independence, and means you are interacting with other kids without adults being around - it's an important part of learning. It's also a good bit of exercise and fresh air each day.

Obviously, you need to be sure they are road-aware and are confident that they know the way, and they will be OK.

My kids walked to school from the age of 7, across town, without any problems. Parents driving their kids to school are, I'm sure, doing it because they feel the streets are dangerous, but the biggest danger is all the cars parking around schools!

But if there is no option but to drive, it would be good if the parking attendants turned a blind eye if they are literally stopping the car, dropping off, and driving on. Trouble is, parking attendant mentality is exactly the opposite, it will be seen as a way to boost the figures.
If your kid lives within, say, a mile of the school, they should be walking there anyway! When I grew up in what was apparently a fairly rough council estate, we all walked to school from the age of about 6. We were walked by parents the first couple of days, just to make sure we'd be OK, and I'm sure they followed for another couple, but then we were on our own. It teaches independence, and means you are interacting with other kids without adults being around - it's an important part of learning. It's also a good bit of exercise and fresh air each day. Obviously, you need to be sure they are road-aware and are confident that they know the way, and they will be OK. My kids walked to school from the age of 7, across town, without any problems. Parents driving their kids to school are, I'm sure, doing it because they feel the streets are dangerous, but the biggest danger is all the cars parking around schools! But if there is no option but to drive, it would be good if the parking attendants turned a blind eye if they are literally stopping the car, dropping off, and driving on. Trouble is, parking attendant mentality is exactly the opposite, it will be seen as a way to boost the figures. romantic

12:26pm Thu 13 Feb 14

Reginald47 says...

romantic wrote:
If your kid lives within, say, a mile of the school, they should be walking there anyway! When I grew up in what was apparently a fairly rough council estate, we all walked to school from the age of about 6. We were walked by parents the first couple of days, just to make sure we'd be OK, and I'm sure they followed for another couple, but then we were on our own. It teaches independence, and means you are interacting with other kids without adults being around - it's an important part of learning. It's also a good bit of exercise and fresh air each day. Obviously, you need to be sure they are road-aware and are confident that they know the way, and they will be OK. My kids walked to school from the age of 7, across town, without any problems. Parents driving their kids to school are, I'm sure, doing it because they feel the streets are dangerous, but the biggest danger is all the cars parking around schools! But if there is no option but to drive, it would be good if the parking attendants turned a blind eye if they are literally stopping the car, dropping off, and driving on. Trouble is, parking attendant mentality is exactly the opposite, it will be seen as a way to boost the figures.
Actually there altready is a blind eye turned for dropping off and picking up, but not for having a chinwag. If that wasn't the case thousands of tickets would be issued each day. Colchester Castle is right - no stopping on zig-zags or double yellows, but 10 minutes discretion in parking bays would seem to be the answer. Plus of course driving the kids to school only if you really need to - and that's quite rare.
[quote][p][bold]romantic[/bold] wrote: If your kid lives within, say, a mile of the school, they should be walking there anyway! When I grew up in what was apparently a fairly rough council estate, we all walked to school from the age of about 6. We were walked by parents the first couple of days, just to make sure we'd be OK, and I'm sure they followed for another couple, but then we were on our own. It teaches independence, and means you are interacting with other kids without adults being around - it's an important part of learning. It's also a good bit of exercise and fresh air each day. Obviously, you need to be sure they are road-aware and are confident that they know the way, and they will be OK. My kids walked to school from the age of 7, across town, without any problems. Parents driving their kids to school are, I'm sure, doing it because they feel the streets are dangerous, but the biggest danger is all the cars parking around schools! But if there is no option but to drive, it would be good if the parking attendants turned a blind eye if they are literally stopping the car, dropping off, and driving on. Trouble is, parking attendant mentality is exactly the opposite, it will be seen as a way to boost the figures.[/p][/quote]Actually there altready is a blind eye turned for dropping off and picking up, but not for having a chinwag. If that wasn't the case thousands of tickets would be issued each day. Colchester Castle is right - no stopping on zig-zags or double yellows, but 10 minutes discretion in parking bays would seem to be the answer. Plus of course driving the kids to school only if you really need to - and that's quite rare. Reginald47

2:16pm Thu 13 Feb 14

cynicalsubber says...

Romantic, I grew up in London and had to cross a main road to get to primary school - no zebra crossing or lollipop person - and because my mother was frequently ill, from the age of four I was often walked by the 'big girl' next door - who would only have been 8 or 9 at the time.
The trouble is, anyone doing that these days would probably find themselves being investigated for possible neglect: we've developed such paranoia for our children that we've lost all perspective as to what is actually dangerous for them. It's delaying their development in crucial areas.
Romantic, I grew up in London and had to cross a main road to get to primary school - no zebra crossing or lollipop person - and because my mother was frequently ill, from the age of four I was often walked by the 'big girl' next door - who would only have been 8 or 9 at the time. The trouble is, anyone doing that these days would probably find themselves being investigated for possible neglect: we've developed such paranoia for our children that we've lost all perspective as to what is actually dangerous for them. It's delaying their development in crucial areas. cynicalsubber

3:46pm Thu 13 Feb 14

SAndrewss says...

This is quite amusing. Parents of children attending the school were recently up in arms about a new Sainsbury's on the corner of Butt Road, complaining that it would cause an increase in traffic would affect them during their school runs.
Surely these proposed parking restrictions would reduce traffic considerably, particularly at school start/finish times, they should be ecstatic.
Alternatively they could, park at Sainsburys and walk from there. Or just walk, if they are not within walking distance then why are they attending that school in the first place?
This is quite amusing. Parents of children attending the school were recently up in arms about a new Sainsbury's on the corner of Butt Road, complaining that it would cause an increase in traffic would affect them during their school runs. Surely these proposed parking restrictions would reduce traffic considerably, particularly at school start/finish times, they should be ecstatic. Alternatively they could, park at Sainsburys and walk from there. Or just walk, if they are not within walking distance then why are they attending that school in the first place? SAndrewss

5:55pm Thu 13 Feb 14

bev52 says...

I use to live opposite a school and it was a nightmare with the parents parking. there is no need for it and its dangerous for the children.
Many parents drove through laziness and working parents can always do what I done with my own children and get up a bit earlier and walk the children to school or park in a safe car park and walk them to the school.
Its pure laziness to need to have to pull up right outside the school and there is no excuse.
I use to live opposite a school and it was a nightmare with the parents parking. there is no need for it and its dangerous for the children. Many parents drove through laziness and working parents can always do what I done with my own children and get up a bit earlier and walk the children to school or park in a safe car park and walk them to the school. Its pure laziness to need to have to pull up right outside the school and there is no excuse. bev52

6:54pm Thu 13 Feb 14

Ritchie_Hicks says...

bev52 wrote:
I use to live opposite a school and it was a nightmare with the parents parking. there is no need for it and its dangerous for the children.
Many parents drove through laziness and working parents can always do what I done with my own children and get up a bit earlier and walk the children to school or park in a safe car park and walk them to the school.
Its pure laziness to need to have to pull up right outside the school and there is no excuse.
That's quite a generalisation you've made.

I have to drive 3 miles to school and school starts at 8.50am, and I then have to be at work for a 9am start (which is 3 miles in the opposite direction). My daughter is too young to walk that journey without at adult.

Going by your theory, by the time I walked from the school to work it would be 9.30 and I would be late. No employer would put up with that 5 days a week.

I'm not being lazy, I'm being practical. Granted some parents could walk, but many have to drop the kids and then get to work in time and because of the way that children are admitted to school it's not always possible to get your children into one right on your doorstep.
[quote][p][bold]bev52[/bold] wrote: I use to live opposite a school and it was a nightmare with the parents parking. there is no need for it and its dangerous for the children. Many parents drove through laziness and working parents can always do what I done with my own children and get up a bit earlier and walk the children to school or park in a safe car park and walk them to the school. Its pure laziness to need to have to pull up right outside the school and there is no excuse.[/p][/quote]That's quite a generalisation you've made. I have to drive 3 miles to school and school starts at 8.50am, and I then have to be at work for a 9am start (which is 3 miles in the opposite direction). My daughter is too young to walk that journey without at adult. Going by your theory, by the time I walked from the school to work it would be 9.30 and I would be late. No employer would put up with that 5 days a week. I'm not being lazy, I'm being practical. Granted some parents could walk, but many have to drop the kids and then get to work in time and because of the way that children are admitted to school it's not always possible to get your children into one right on your doorstep. Ritchie_Hicks

7:47pm Thu 13 Feb 14

Red Tape 2 says...

There is no chance they will listen - this council are anti-car out of principle and don't give a **** how difficult that makes everyone's life. They are rose-tinted tree-hugging morons!
There is no chance they will listen - this council are anti-car out of principle and don't give a **** how difficult that makes everyone's life. They are rose-tinted tree-hugging morons! Red Tape 2

3:11am Fri 14 Feb 14

Let's get rational says...

Maybe there could be a permit for parents to apply for that would allow parking for a short period of time. They would only be allowed the permit if they met certain criteria e.g work or distance to travel to get to school. Then the parents within walking distance and without other responsibilities would have to walk their children to school.
Maybe there could be a permit for parents to apply for that would allow parking for a short period of time. They would only be allowed the permit if they met certain criteria e.g work or distance to travel to get to school. Then the parents within walking distance and without other responsibilities would have to walk their children to school. Let's get rational

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