Experts brought after hundreds of complaints following huge landslide at Stanway

Essex County Standard: Experts brought after hundreds of complaints following huge landslide at Stanway Experts brought after hundreds of complaints following huge landslide at Stanway

Experts are being brought in to allay residents’ fears after hundreds of complaints following a huge landslide at a rubbish dump.

In what is believed to be an unprecedented move the Environment Agency is going to monitor the air for four months at the Cory Environmental site at the Bellhouse Landfill Site in Warren Lane, Stanway.

Its follows a landslide in August, in which waste the size of a football pitch-and-a-half moved a significant distance.

In a completely separate incident three months later a blower broke at the EDL site, which converts lane fill gases to electricity, on the other side of Warren Lane, again causing bad smell for residents.

Since the August landslide the Environment Agency has received more than 100 calls about bad smells in the area.

Stanway resident Mrs Good spoke at Wednesday’s parish council meeting and said: “Why didn’t they start monitoring the air when this first occurred?"

See today's Gazette for the full story. 

 

Comments (26)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

5:10pm Mon 3 Feb 14

InsiderintheEA says...

Inside the Environment Agency have been exposing the failings of the Environment Agency for going on a year now: http://www.insidethe
environmentagency.co
.uk/
Inside the Environment Agency have been exposing the failings of the Environment Agency for going on a year now: http://www.insidethe environmentagency.co .uk/ InsiderintheEA

5:41pm Mon 3 Feb 14

All_talk_no_action says...

Huge landslide, good god, how many people unaccounted for? One? Thousands?
Government inquiry?

No a bit of stinky wast land.
Huge landslide, good god, how many people unaccounted for? One? Thousands? Government inquiry? No a bit of stinky wast land. All_talk_no_action

5:59pm Mon 3 Feb 14

OMPITA [Intl] says...

A significant distance eh?

Wow!

Just what that might be then?

Are we talking inches, feet, yards, or what?

Go on - give us a clue...........

And BTW, what did it register on the Ricther Scale?
A significant distance eh? Wow! Just what that might be then? Are we talking inches, feet, yards, or what? Go on - give us a clue........... And BTW, what did it register on the Ricther Scale? OMPITA [Intl]

10:09pm Mon 3 Feb 14

Goonerboy says...

Something is not right with this Landfill site. The smell is noticble as you come off the A12 at Eight Ash Green. From our house some 3 miles from the site we can regularly smell it.
Something is not right with this Landfill site. The smell is noticble as you come off the A12 at Eight Ash Green. From our house some 3 miles from the site we can regularly smell it. Goonerboy

10:44pm Mon 3 Feb 14

Reginald47 says...

The methane like smell is very strong on some days and I'm near the town centre.
The methane like smell is very strong on some days and I'm near the town centre. Reginald47

12:03am Tue 4 Feb 14

Citizen 139 says...

Reginald47 wrote:
The methane like smell is very strong on some days and I'm near the town centre.
Unsure what you can smell, but Methane is odourless.
[quote][p][bold]Reginald47[/bold] wrote: The methane like smell is very strong on some days and I'm near the town centre.[/p][/quote]Unsure what you can smell, but Methane is odourless. Citizen 139

7:53am Tue 4 Feb 14

Goonerboy says...

Citizen 139 wrote:
Reginald47 wrote:
The methane like smell is very strong on some days and I'm near the town centre.
Unsure what you can smell, but Methane is odourless.
It's the ammonia . Sulfides and NMOC's non methane organic compounds if you must be picky ! It still stinks !!!
[quote][p][bold]Citizen 139[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Reginald47[/bold] wrote: The methane like smell is very strong on some days and I'm near the town centre.[/p][/quote]Unsure what you can smell, but Methane is odourless.[/p][/quote]It's the ammonia . Sulfides and NMOC's non methane organic compounds if you must be picky ! It still stinks !!! Goonerboy

8:17am Tue 4 Feb 14

jammin says...

Reginald47 wrote:
The methane like smell is very strong on some days and I'm near the town centre.
thats probably the other stench this town is victim to...the Hythe water works!
[quote][p][bold]Reginald47[/bold] wrote: The methane like smell is very strong on some days and I'm near the town centre.[/p][/quote]thats probably the other stench this town is victim to...the Hythe water works! jammin

9:28am Tue 4 Feb 14

Colchester Castle says...

Move next to a refuse site and it smells? Who would have imagined it!
Move next to a refuse site and it smells? Who would have imagined it! Colchester Castle

9:36am Tue 4 Feb 14

OMPITA [Intl] says...

Methane is odourless?

You should try convincing my dear wife of that first thing in the mornings!
Methane is odourless? You should try convincing my dear wife of that first thing in the mornings! OMPITA [Intl]

10:18am Tue 4 Feb 14

stevedawson says...

Me thinks its time for an incinerator.
Me thinks its time for an incinerator. stevedawson

11:10am Tue 4 Feb 14

Catchedicam says...

stevedawson wrote:
Me thinks its time for an incinerator.
Great idea, lets all breathe in carcinogens, dioxins and particulates. What do we do with the 50% ash that is left after burning? Oh yes bury it in the ground, Brilliant! Thankfully you are not in charge of waste management in Essex.
[quote][p][bold]stevedawson[/bold] wrote: Me thinks its time for an incinerator.[/p][/quote]Great idea, lets all breathe in carcinogens, dioxins and particulates. What do we do with the 50% ash that is left after burning? Oh yes bury it in the ground, Brilliant! Thankfully you are not in charge of waste management in Essex. Catchedicam

11:27am Tue 4 Feb 14

Chris2989 says...

I would like to know who writes these online articles for the Gazette. This is the third article today that I've noticed grammatical and spelling errors in! Almost every time i use this website there are new articles all containing errors. Does nobody proof read these articles? Or are the reporters just illiterate?
I would like to know who writes these online articles for the Gazette. This is the third article today that I've noticed grammatical and spelling errors in! Almost every time i use this website there are new articles all containing errors. Does nobody proof read these articles? Or are the reporters just illiterate? Chris2989

4:00pm Tue 4 Feb 14

stevedawson says...

Catch dont talk about things you know nothing about with such frightening and ignorant nonsense.
Catch dont talk about things you know nothing about with such frightening and ignorant nonsense. stevedawson

5:39pm Tue 4 Feb 14

Catchedicam says...

stevedawson wrote:
Catch dont talk about things you know nothing about with such frightening and ignorant nonsense.
I clearly know far more than you with the nonsense you spout.
[quote][p][bold]stevedawson[/bold] wrote: Catch dont talk about things you know nothing about with such frightening and ignorant nonsense.[/p][/quote]I clearly know far more than you with the nonsense you spout. Catchedicam

6:42pm Tue 4 Feb 14

A Very Private Gentleman says...

there has been no noticeable health risks to anyone living in the area remarks about breathing in this and that are unproven.
as for building in the area 40 foot high concrete piles are virtually solid.
the problem is density issues.
it is always the issue i think they call it Essex build.
there has been no noticeable health risks to anyone living in the area remarks about breathing in this and that are unproven. as for building in the area 40 foot high concrete piles are virtually solid. the problem is density issues. it is always the issue i think they call it Essex build. A Very Private Gentleman

3:28pm Wed 5 Feb 14

Im_Like_HELLO says...

Much of Essex is on sand and gravel, I doubt the concrete piles have reached the bedrock and I suspect increasing wet weather is leading to some of the glacial deposits becoming unstable.
Much of Essex is on sand and gravel, I doubt the concrete piles have reached the bedrock and I suspect increasing wet weather is leading to some of the glacial deposits becoming unstable. Im_Like_HELLO

11:58am Thu 6 Feb 14

Jess Jephcott says...

This is a serious matter. I have often noticed the methane based smell when driving near the tip. If you can smell it, that means that the gas is escaping. That gas is highly explosive and years ago I recall somebody being blown up when they took their first cigarette of the day, due to gas seeping through the ground and up through the floorboards of their house. By law, landfill gas must be extracted and burned off to prevent migration through the ground. It cannot be left to simply disperse. If I lived near the site I would be very concerned about the apparent defensive attitude of the site owners. BTW, I am involved with landfill gas abstraction for my job so this is not an uninformed comment.
This is a serious matter. I have often noticed the methane based smell when driving near the tip. If you can smell it, that means that the gas is escaping. That gas is highly explosive and years ago I recall somebody being blown up when they took their first cigarette of the day, due to gas seeping through the ground and up through the floorboards of their house. By law, landfill gas must be extracted and burned off to prevent migration through the ground. It cannot be left to simply disperse. If I lived near the site I would be very concerned about the apparent defensive attitude of the site owners. BTW, I am involved with landfill gas abstraction for my job so this is not an uninformed comment. Jess Jephcott

7:31pm Thu 6 Feb 14

stevedawson says...

It could be a stink hole.
It could be a stink hole. stevedawson

10:31pm Thu 6 Feb 14

Assimilation says...

Catchedicam wrote:
stevedawson wrote:
Me thinks its time for an incinerator.
Great idea, lets all breathe in carcinogens, dioxins and particulates. What do we do with the 50% ash that is left after burning? Oh yes bury it in the ground, Brilliant! Thankfully you are not in charge of waste management in Essex.
Burning is not such a bad idea, it could in turn be used to generate power.

Not being disrespectful but they do it at the crematorium every day. No fumes, no smell and the ashes are buried.

Would it not be better to bury the ashes from land fill rubbish in the ground, than the rubbish itself ?

All you hear is the powers that be harp on about renewable energy but all they seem to want is those stupid windmills and solar panels that blot the land/sea scape's
[quote][p][bold]Catchedicam[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevedawson[/bold] wrote: Me thinks its time for an incinerator.[/p][/quote]Great idea, lets all breathe in carcinogens, dioxins and particulates. What do we do with the 50% ash that is left after burning? Oh yes bury it in the ground, Brilliant! Thankfully you are not in charge of waste management in Essex.[/p][/quote]Burning is not such a bad idea, it could in turn be used to generate power. Not being disrespectful but they do it at the crematorium every day. No fumes, no smell and the ashes are buried. Would it not be better to bury the ashes from land fill rubbish in the ground, than the rubbish itself ? All you hear is the powers that be harp on about renewable energy but all they seem to want is those stupid windmills and solar panels that blot the land/sea scape's Assimilation

6:32am Fri 7 Feb 14

Catchedicam says...

Assimilation wrote:
Catchedicam wrote:
stevedawson wrote:
Me thinks its time for an incinerator.
Great idea, lets all breathe in carcinogens, dioxins and particulates. What do we do with the 50% ash that is left after burning? Oh yes bury it in the ground, Brilliant! Thankfully you are not in charge of waste management in Essex.
Burning is not such a bad idea, it could in turn be used to generate power.

Not being disrespectful but they do it at the crematorium every day. No fumes, no smell and the ashes are buried.

Would it not be better to bury the ashes from land fill rubbish in the ground, than the rubbish itself ?

All you hear is the powers that be harp on about renewable energy but all they seem to want is those stupid windmills and solar panels that blot the land/sea scape's
Energy from waste, requires good quality high calorific material to burn, we remove most of this during initial kerbside recycling. The residue tends to be a mixture of low-grade low calorific pretty nasty detritus. disposable nappies, dog mess, broken pots, and pretty small particles, containing a lot of moisture. While this will burn, it often needs drying out first, i.e. energy input, also the way that it burns is difficult to predict, so setting the incinerator controls is very difficult, if the incinerator is not hot enough then it emits dioxins, and particulates amongst other things. Mixed domestic waste is never the same, so the quality varies hourly never mains daily or weekly, so this is a very unpredictable process, requiring quite high energy inputs to be safe. So none or very little energy recovered from it. 50% by weight of what goes in will be left as ash, this is very hazardous to handle, and you would not want to breath it in. Various studies are currently underway to try and find a safe use for it, i.e. mixing it with cement, concrete and road making materials, but no disposal route can deal with the sheer volume that is produced, burial in normal landfill is illegal because of the hazards associated with it. The crematorium on the other hand deals with small volumes, and knows what is going into it, and as its a single batch the calculations can be made to ensure a clean burn, and people want the ash that remains.
[quote][p][bold]Assimilation[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Catchedicam[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevedawson[/bold] wrote: Me thinks its time for an incinerator.[/p][/quote]Great idea, lets all breathe in carcinogens, dioxins and particulates. What do we do with the 50% ash that is left after burning? Oh yes bury it in the ground, Brilliant! Thankfully you are not in charge of waste management in Essex.[/p][/quote]Burning is not such a bad idea, it could in turn be used to generate power. Not being disrespectful but they do it at the crematorium every day. No fumes, no smell and the ashes are buried. Would it not be better to bury the ashes from land fill rubbish in the ground, than the rubbish itself ? All you hear is the powers that be harp on about renewable energy but all they seem to want is those stupid windmills and solar panels that blot the land/sea scape's[/p][/quote]Energy from waste, requires good quality high calorific material to burn, we remove most of this during initial kerbside recycling. The residue tends to be a mixture of low-grade low calorific pretty nasty detritus. disposable nappies, dog mess, broken pots, and pretty small particles, containing a lot of moisture. While this will burn, it often needs drying out first, i.e. energy input, also the way that it burns is difficult to predict, so setting the incinerator controls is very difficult, if the incinerator is not hot enough then it emits dioxins, and particulates amongst other things. Mixed domestic waste is never the same, so the quality varies hourly never mains daily or weekly, so this is a very unpredictable process, requiring quite high energy inputs to be safe. So none or very little energy recovered from it. 50% by weight of what goes in will be left as ash, this is very hazardous to handle, and you would not want to breath it in. Various studies are currently underway to try and find a safe use for it, i.e. mixing it with cement, concrete and road making materials, but no disposal route can deal with the sheer volume that is produced, burial in normal landfill is illegal because of the hazards associated with it. The crematorium on the other hand deals with small volumes, and knows what is going into it, and as its a single batch the calculations can be made to ensure a clean burn, and people want the ash that remains. Catchedicam

11:13am Fri 7 Feb 14

Jess Jephcott says...

Landfill sites all over the country use the methane gas to generate electricity. It can be 60% at the centre of fresh rubbish decreasing to perhaps 30% at the perimeter of the site. An engine will run on 50% very effectively and I have had dealings with sites that are generating 3MW from one site. That is electricity for free 24 hours a day. Why isn't Colchester doing this? But the important factor here is that the gas will percolate through the ground to surrounding housing if it is not controlled by drilling wells and using fans to suck the gas through to a flare stack or to put it through an electricity generator. If you can smell it, that means it is not being controlled properly and can present a danger. But don't take my word for it, consult the experts like Veolia or Biffa who are making a lot of money from this free supply of energy.
Landfill sites all over the country use the methane gas to generate electricity. It can be 60% at the centre of fresh rubbish decreasing to perhaps 30% at the perimeter of the site. An engine will run on 50% very effectively and I have had dealings with sites that are generating 3MW from one site. That is electricity for free 24 hours a day. Why isn't Colchester doing this? But the important factor here is that the gas will percolate through the ground to surrounding housing if it is not controlled by drilling wells and using fans to suck the gas through to a flare stack or to put it through an electricity generator. If you can smell it, that means it is not being controlled properly and can present a danger. But don't take my word for it, consult the experts like Veolia or Biffa who are making a lot of money from this free supply of energy. Jess Jephcott

5:04pm Sat 8 Feb 14

stevedawson says...

Energy input is always needed when incinerating but powerout is the result not bad smells and polluted ground that we have all over the country at the moment.sweden has been doing it for years.
Energy input is always needed when incinerating but powerout is the result not bad smells and polluted ground that we have all over the country at the moment.sweden has been doing it for years. stevedawson

5:33pm Sat 8 Feb 14

Catchedicam says...

stevedawson wrote:
Energy input is always needed when incinerating but powerout is the result not bad smells and polluted ground that we have all over the country at the moment.sweden has been doing it for years.
Before you reveal even more of your ignorance in this subject, I suggest that you read the following. http://www.ipen.org/
ipenweb/documents/wo
rk%20documents/incin
eration_ash.pdf

Notwithstanding the additional CO2 that is released from incineration instead of recovery. It is quite simply a waste of precious resources.
[quote][p][bold]stevedawson[/bold] wrote: Energy input is always needed when incinerating but powerout is the result not bad smells and polluted ground that we have all over the country at the moment.sweden has been doing it for years.[/p][/quote]Before you reveal even more of your ignorance in this subject, I suggest that you read the following. http://www.ipen.org/ ipenweb/documents/wo rk%20documents/incin eration_ash.pdf Notwithstanding the additional CO2 that is released from incineration instead of recovery. It is quite simply a waste of precious resources. Catchedicam

12:33pm Sun 9 Feb 14

Jess Jephcott says...

This has nothing to do with incineration. This has everything to do with the anaerobic decomposition of bio-degradable material. Methane is produced by our rubbish when it is buried and deprived of oxygen. Methane will be produced for decades to come and will always need to be controlled. Inineration is quite something else.
This has nothing to do with incineration. This has everything to do with the anaerobic decomposition of bio-degradable material. Methane is produced by our rubbish when it is buried and deprived of oxygen. Methane will be produced for decades to come and will always need to be controlled. Inineration is quite something else. Jess Jephcott

1:14pm Sun 9 Feb 14

Catchedicam says...

Jess Jephcott wrote:
This has nothing to do with incineration. This has everything to do with the anaerobic decomposition of bio-degradable material. Methane is produced by our rubbish when it is buried and deprived of oxygen. Methane will be produced for decades to come and will always need to be controlled. Inineration is quite something else.
Indeed Jess, you are absolutely correct, in what you say but Stevedawson was suggesting that we need incineration rather than landfill totally ignoring the issues that creates, in term of recycling, emissions, and highly toxic ash residue, that currently still needs to be landfilled anyway.
[quote][p][bold]Jess Jephcott[/bold] wrote: This has nothing to do with incineration. This has everything to do with the anaerobic decomposition of bio-degradable material. Methane is produced by our rubbish when it is buried and deprived of oxygen. Methane will be produced for decades to come and will always need to be controlled. Inineration is quite something else.[/p][/quote]Indeed Jess, you are absolutely correct, in what you say but Stevedawson was suggesting that we need incineration rather than landfill totally ignoring the issues that creates, in term of recycling, emissions, and highly toxic ash residue, that currently still needs to be landfilled anyway. Catchedicam

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree