Buntings' creditors - Essex firms "no prospect" of payment

FIRMS from Essex are among unsecured creditors owed nearly £1million in total.

BSW Marquees, based in Station Road, Rayne, is owed £55,527 for its services to Bunting and Sons.

Director Andrew Fitzwater said: “The news Bunting and Sons had gone into administration was not so much of a shock.

“I had spoken to Stephen Bunting on quite a few occasions leading up to the announcement and we were led to believe they were on the brink of solving their problems.

“The way he behaved was dishonourable, but not illegal. I think they have been pre-occupied and blinkered with the planning application, to the detriment of the business.

“We knew we took a risk in dealing with them and tried to minimise it.

“We did get £20,000 over the last six months out of them, so we did achieve a little back, but the risk did not work out the way we hoped.

“We would much rather have the money, but it won’t affect us financially. If you rely on your creditors in business, you have made a mistake. It must be an emotional time for the Buntings and we empathise a bit. It is a well-established old company.

“It does not look as though we will get a penny and I am exploring legal arrangements to pursue them personally.

“I don’t want to do that if it causes anguish and pain, but if they are able to pay I will look at that.”

Tony Collins, a director at Collins and Coward planning consultants, which was based on the Westwood Park business site owned by Bunting and Sons, said his firm was owed “a substantial amount more” than the £17,176 on the creditors’ report.

He added: “It has a significant impact on a small business. We look forward to settlement as soon as possible.

“Having done all the planning work on the Horkesley Park application we are disappointed to be in the position we are in.”

Colchester Council is owed £48,621 in unpaid business rates.

Paul Smith, councillor for finance, said: “I don’t want to comment on this specific case.

We will continue to seek to collect money we are owed.’’ Wine expert Mary Mudd, who set up Carter’s Vineyards, owned until recently by Bunting and Sons, is owed £2,500 in consultancy fees she says date back to 2010.

Mrs Mudd said: “It is a sad situation.

I was one of the supporters of their scheme. I was hoping when it came to fruition I would be involved with it. I feel it is sad for the Buntings. I know it has made them sad and embarrassed to be in that position.”

Comments (5)

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1:43pm Thu 5 Dec 13

HARRY438 says...

Eggs in a basket.
Eggs in a basket. HARRY438

10:08pm Thu 5 Dec 13

Hamiltonandy says...

Shameful for one generation of Buntings to destroy so much of their family's assets. I remember all those letters demanding the Buntings Theme Park and yet this family could not have completed it because they had severe debt problems. Looks like the Jumbo saga will be Buntings Theme Park all over again.
Shameful for one generation of Buntings to destroy so much of their family's assets. I remember all those letters demanding the Buntings Theme Park and yet this family could not have completed it because they had severe debt problems. Looks like the Jumbo saga will be Buntings Theme Park all over again. Hamiltonandy

2:32am Fri 6 Dec 13

Boris says...

I feel sorry for the Buntings' employees, but not for the Bunting family, who have behaved like the Gadarene swine.
It would be good if Mr Braithwaite's oplans for Jumbo were to end up the same way, but he does not seem to possess the Buntings' degree of stupidity.
We should also be sorry for the Buntings' Suffolk Punch horses, which could now end up in ready meals from Tesco.
I feel sorry for the Buntings' employees, but not for the Bunting family, who have behaved like the Gadarene swine. It would be good if Mr Braithwaite's oplans for Jumbo were to end up the same way, but he does not seem to possess the Buntings' degree of stupidity. We should also be sorry for the Buntings' Suffolk Punch horses, which could now end up in ready meals from Tesco. Boris

2:34am Fri 6 Dec 13

Boris says...

plans, not oplans - sorry
plans, not oplans - sorry Boris

7:45am Mon 9 Dec 13

rhetoric says...

Now that the Roman Gods of Finance (or was it some Celtic deity so far undiscovered by the modern pundits?) have shown their distaste for unwanted development of our countryside, I was drafting an ironic comment about Old Colchester and surrounds striking back at the threat of ever more destruction of tradition and beauty.
.
A flash power cut destroyed my draft!
.
So, you won't be able to read my theories about the future spontaneous combustion of bars and takeaways in the High Street, earthquakes under the newest housing developments, the miraculous overnight restoration of the post WW2 Public LIbrary in its spacious, clean and attractive building and so on.
.
With the addition of a bit more sheltered waiting accommodation than of yore, the old Bus Park as it was known would also re-appear in St John's Street, with the Milk Bar handily opposite for the refreshment of travellers.
.
The nasty new fast roads through the Town would also subside into the ground, St Botolphs Corner would again be a hive of little and interesting shops, which would spread up towards Queen St in a short time pushing out the takeaways and clubs; anything commercial, West of the Town Hall , would be higher end retailing, and so on.
.
Restore Oliver Parkers and Forsdyke and Bonners, put the Post Office back where it was in Head Street, and you're getting towards a decent Town.
.
I guess all this would also require out of town retail parks and the like to be found sitting on quicksand or marshes, and possibly fuel for private cars to become horribly expensive, not to mention the vehicles themselves becoming beyond the reach of most families, financially.
.
Apart from the (un-) natural phenomena mentioned, a lot of the above was in place in my lifetime. However did we manage? Well, actually we did have a happy life in a great place. If we were unwell, the GP came to the house to attend to us and therefore knew the family, its assets and its problems which could be factored into the greater understanding of any health issues. Many delivery services were available on a regular basis eg greengrocery, fuel, ironmongery, dairy, baker and so on visiting several times a week. Potatoes were not scrubbed to extinction, but had a fair amount of soil or clay adhering, they could be bought by the sack and would last a long time in a dark place in the shed.
.
There wasn't a lot of trouble over refuse collection and disposal, since there wasn't a whole lot of packaging! During WW2 we even smoothed out, folded and took back for re-use, the paper bags dispensed by shops. The main content of the (metal) dustbins was ash and cinders from the coal fires and coke-fuelled boilers.
.
"Progress" has brought us to an undesirable place.
Now that the Roman Gods of Finance (or was it some Celtic deity so far undiscovered by the modern pundits?) have shown their distaste for unwanted development of our countryside, I was drafting an ironic comment about Old Colchester and surrounds striking back at the threat of ever more destruction of tradition and beauty. . A flash power cut destroyed my draft! . So, you won't be able to read my theories about the future spontaneous combustion of bars and takeaways in the High Street, earthquakes under the newest housing developments, the miraculous overnight restoration of the post WW2 Public LIbrary in its spacious, clean and attractive building and so on. . With the addition of a bit more sheltered waiting accommodation than of yore, the old Bus Park as it was known would also re-appear in St John's Street, with the Milk Bar handily opposite for the refreshment of travellers. . The nasty new fast roads through the Town would also subside into the ground, St Botolphs Corner would again be a hive of little and interesting shops, which would spread up towards Queen St in a short time pushing out the takeaways and clubs; anything commercial, West of the Town Hall , would be higher end retailing, and so on. . Restore Oliver Parkers and Forsdyke and Bonners, put the Post Office back where it was in Head Street, and you're getting towards a decent Town. . I guess all this would also require out of town retail parks and the like to be found sitting on quicksand or marshes, and possibly fuel for private cars to become horribly expensive, not to mention the vehicles themselves becoming beyond the reach of most families, financially. . Apart from the (un-) natural phenomena mentioned, a lot of the above was in place in my lifetime. However did we manage? Well, actually we did have a happy life in a great place. If we were unwell, the GP came to the house to attend to us and therefore knew the family, its assets and its problems which could be factored into the greater understanding of any health issues. Many delivery services were available on a regular basis eg greengrocery, fuel, ironmongery, dairy, baker and so on visiting several times a week. Potatoes were not scrubbed to extinction, but had a fair amount of soil or clay adhering, they could be bought by the sack and would last a long time in a dark place in the shed. . There wasn't a lot of trouble over refuse collection and disposal, since there wasn't a whole lot of packaging! During WW2 we even smoothed out, folded and took back for re-use, the paper bags dispensed by shops. The main content of the (metal) dustbins was ash and cinders from the coal fires and coke-fuelled boilers. . "Progress" has brought us to an undesirable place. rhetoric

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